1095 with hamon quench Q

Discussion in 'Shop Talk - BladeSmith Questions and Answers' started by H20MOFO, Mar 28, 2017.

  1. H20MOFO

    H20MOFO

    20
    Apr 20, 2016
    I have been wanting to try my hand at this for a while. My 2" by 42" belt and 6" disk combo sander showed up last night.
    And I have an 18" x 3/16 x 1.5 piece of 1095 is due tomorrow....could only find a2 locally.
    I read the sticky above on 1095....to use a fast oil. Can anyone suggest a fast oil with out breaking the bank?
    I am not positive what I am gonna try and grind out...maybe a chopper/camp knife....maybe a big tanto.
    What ever it is I want a hamon. Would the heat treat method be different with a hamon??
    I have alot of time on my hands at work and have been watching a bunch of Walter Sorrell vids.
    He put a hamon on a piece of 1095....then water quenched it for a few seconds.....and if memory serves correct it went from the water into 300* oil.
    Would the water quench make a harder edge? Not looking to reinvent the wheel here...just curious why he would water quench it.
    Kreg
     
  2. sharpeknives

    sharpeknives

    Jan 13, 2006
    If you water quench be prepared to crack a lot of blades.
    I put hamons on most of my blades and 1095 is my steel of choice. I recommend Parks#50 quench oil.
    Making a decent Hamon takes practice. Good luck and don't give up.
     
  3. H20MOFO

    H20MOFO

    20
    Apr 20, 2016
    Thanks...I heard a couple of guys talking about parks 50. I have a hunch I cant afford a 5 gal bucket of that right now.
    Is there a second best I can get at a grocery store or lowes ect?? I have heard of guys using canaola and peanut oil.
     
  4. samuraistuart

    samuraistuart KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Dec 21, 2006
    3/16" thick 1095 will struggle to harden thoroughly with canola oil. You can do an interrupted quench....quench in brine for about 3 seconds, then into 130° canola oil. You'll get nice hardness from the brine, and as the martensite begins to form, the oil will help prevent dreaded *ping*.
     

Share This Page