2020... is it hard for you too?

Discussion in 'Community Center' started by Smiling, Aug 29, 2020.

  1. PirateSeulb

    PirateSeulb

    Jun 6, 2017
    I can say I got to feel some fear toward the end if you have ever noticed where I list as my location you might put it together. But not just living in that city I work not too far from where the explosion occurred. Having to go into work on that Monday I wasn’t sure how safe being downtown was in the days leading up to a return to the office.
     
  2. Piso Mojado

    Piso Mojado Basic Member Basic Member

    Jan 11, 2006
    Last update from 2020:

    My wife became ill 12/5. On 12/6 she seemed a little better but was running a low fever, and I called a fire department ambulance. Our closest hospital surprised me by letting me stay with her in the ER for 7 hours until she was admitted. I helped the ER nurse with her a nasal swab test which came back negative. On 12/7 she got a real Covid-19 test, a throat swab which goes to an outside lab. Not knowing what to do, the hospital discharged my wife on 12/8. The throat swab came back positive on 12/10. Only 72 hours, nice work guys! Obviously she should have stayed in the hospital, but I am convinced that 48 hours on oxygen and an IV stabilized her. The hospital mailed us a $20 finger pulse oximeter with an instruction booklet, addressed to my wife by her first name only. They told me to care for her masked and wearing protective clothing, keeping six feet distant at all times. Jawohl, mein Führer!

    One thing you should understand (if you have managed to miss it up to now) is that Covid-19 is extremely contagious. It is a close second to measles, which only wins the derby by staying active on surfaces an extra 24 hours. So caring for someone infected at home, if you have a couple of HAZMAT suits and a couple of servants to help you, is safe enough if you follow proper procedures. Otherwise, count on catching it yourself. By 12/15 I was obviously ill. The symptoms were like influenza B, each symptom less distressing but more symptoms. Our closest hospital is a 312 bed non-profit teaching hospital. By 12/15 they were at 87% capacity with 4 ICU beds free, 85 Covid-19 patients, and accepting no more of us. On 12/26 I did a drive through test in their parking lot, a throat swab by one technician supervised by one MD, both wearing HAZMAT suits. It came back positive in 24 hours! If you have a choice between testing drive through and in a hospital or clinic, I recommend drive through. Eat nothing beforehand. A throat swab is a 2 minute test of your gag reflex.

    Our relative the substitute teacher is waiting for the bomb to drop. The Chicago Public Schools has scheduled reopening in stages: January 11, pre-kindergarten and Special Ed "clusters." The clusters are closed classrooms for the most severely afflicted, kids who shouldn't be in the public school system but are. Everyone else goes back February 1. In school and remote students will be in the same classroom: even magnet schools aren't equipped for this, but the teachers are supposed to be creative and deal with it.

    CPS has refused to negotiate the new reopening schedule with the Chicago Teachers Union, as required by law. No one is big on the rule of law nowadays, including our Mayor the former Assistant U.S. Attorney. The Illinois Educational Labor Relation Board (IELRB) has scheduled a trial before an administrative law judge on January 26.

    It may interest you to know that Chicago is without a Superintendent of Schools, and has not had one in 25 years. Typically a Superintendent of Schools has years of experience as a classroom teacher, followed by years as a school principal, followed by an EdD in school administration. In 1995, the General Assembly turned CPS over to Chicago's Major Richard M. Daley. Richie wanted his budget director Paul Vallas for Superintendent. Unfortunately Paul was not qualified even for substitute teaching without a lot of remedial classwork, so he became the CPS "CEO," a title unheard of until then.

    I've been talking to my stepson every week about his job in Vietnam, and I've learned more. He and his family flew from Manila to Ho Chi Minh City in a chartered flight for foreign skilled workers. They all had to test negative for Covid-19 before the flight. That was no problem, $40 at a Manila hospital. The real problem was his FBI criminal background check, which you need to work in Vietnam. That came through 10 days before his flight (2nd application). When they deplaned in HCMC, they were met by health service workers in HAZMAT suits who drove them in a van to their quarantine hotel, which I would describe as the world's largest Super 8 Motel. All entrances but the main entrance were locked and sealed with barrier tape. The hotel staff were friendly and happy to see them. Without their government takeover, the hotel would have closed and they would all be living with relatives trying to sell stuff on the street.

    While quarantined 14 days, my stepson and his family were each throat swab tested for Covid-19 four times. If you test positive in Vietnam, you go into a Covid-19 hospital until you test negative. What are Covid-19 hospitals? When a hospital admits its first Covid-19 patient, the other patients are removed and it becomes a Covid-19 hospital. I wonder who thought of that. It must have been someone with a degree in epidemiology.

    I have videos of his cab commute to work. Most of the traffic is antique Honda motor scooters rebuilt with cheap Chinese parts so they barely run. About 90% of the scooter drivers are masked. The ones without masks should be cited and fined, but the traffic police can't be everywhere. The Vietnamese call them "yellow dogs" because of their khaki uniforms. Traffic police don't get much respect anywhere.

    They went to a mall theater to see Wonder Woman 1984 for their youngest child's birthday. It was my stepson's Christmas break and they went to an early matinee on a weekday. There were about 30 others, all Vietnamese because there are no tourists. No special seating, but people sat with the groups they came with and not next to others. Everyone was masked of course. Except for the face masks and no tourists, life goes on as normal. Many people wear face masks in public during Vietnam's flu season, April to September.

    On December 1, Ho Chi Minh City had its first local transmission of Covid-19 in 89 days. A 32 year-old man visited his brother, an airline flight attendant who was home quarantined after returning from working a flight to Japan. The flight attendant tested positive November 30 and so did his brother two days later. When you jump in without delay to control things, you can trace contacts and stop outbreaks from spreading. The 32 year-old's 137 contacts were located and placed in a quarantine hotel, and the international school where he worked as a teacher was temporarily closed.
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2021
  3. The Amazing Virginian

    The Amazing Virginian Gold Member Gold Member

    Feb 24, 2010
    I honestly don't know how I have avoided this so far as soooooo many people I know have gotten it. I do wear an N95 mask or at a minimum a KN95 mask pretty religiously whenever I leave the house. My business partner got it two weeks ago and his senses of taste and smell still haven't returned.

    And I heard a virologist say the other day that things may not return to what we used to consider normal for 30 years due to the rate at which the Wuhan virus mutates. Fun.
     
  4. steelhead seeker

    steelhead seeker

    323
    Aug 1, 2014
    Been a rough year for sure. Lost my job back in april...so far the plant i worked at went from 500+ employees to about only 100 now...sucks too, I actually really really liked my job. I spent 8 years at a soul sucking job I hated and left there to go to this place and really enjoyed the last 5 years I worked there. Great pay, great coworkers and just loved the industry. Worked in a titanium casting plant making airplane engines and other stuff...who'd of thought 1 little bat would bring the entire airplane industry to a halt...worst part, my wife still works there (which is great) and she gets to hear everyone bitch and complain about how they want to be laid off cause they are lazy pieces of shit.

    To top it off my grandpa tested positive for the rony and is on a ventilator now...they say he's got a 50/50 shot... I don't think this is near over. Even with the vaccine coming out. Doesnt look good either that lots of front line health workers don't want the vaccine. What do they know we dont...

    Edit: mom txted me last night while I was sleeping to let me know her dad passed. F**k...
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2021
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  5. The Amazing Virginian

    The Amazing Virginian Gold Member Gold Member

    Feb 24, 2010
    Please accept my condolences. :(
     
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  6. Steven65

    Steven65 Traditional Hog Platinum Member

    Mar 11, 2008
    My deepest condolences to you and your family for your loss.
     
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  7. Smiling

    Smiling

    Nov 21, 2019
    So sorry for your loss
     
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  8. steelhead seeker

    steelhead seeker

    323
    Aug 1, 2014
    Thanks for the replies guys. Tough times for lots of people. It is what it is. We can only roll with the punches. I appreciate the condolences.
     
    Lee D and Smiling like this.
  9. annr

    annr

    Nov 15, 2006
    In 30 years many will have no frame of reference, or 2019 normal will be a dim memory—for those still alive.
     
  10. PirateSeulb

    PirateSeulb

    Jun 6, 2017
    Honestly along those lines of more general way things just change many might agree 2019s normal was significantly different than 1989s normal. Much can and likely will change to society and the world regardless of the virus.
     
  11. cchu518

    cchu518 Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 6, 2013
    Wishing everyone a much better 2021. I was laid off in February. I handled capital market strategies and communications for companies IPO'ing. As you can imagine that went to heck. It's been nearly 10 months that I've been out of work.

    Yesterday I received my first offer to help a RE Development firm restructure it's debt them roll it's assets into a pivate equity and subsequent capital raise with limited partners. I'm in the last round with a very large communications shop today as well and expect an offer. Will have to decide between the two.

    Wishing everyone better days though, keep the faith!
     
  12. The Amazing Virginian

    The Amazing Virginian Gold Member Gold Member

    Feb 24, 2010
    "to help a RE Development firm restructure it's debt them roll it's assets into a pivate equity and subsequent capital raise with limited partners."

    Not smart enough to understand what all of that actually means (maybe RE means real estate???) . . . but wish you 100% luck in making the best choice between your offers and a good start to a better 2021!
     
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  13. upnorth

    upnorth Basic Member Basic Member

    Nov 25, 2006
    Despite being on day 8 of being Covid positive, and coming close to a hospital visit on two days from shortness of breath, I am grateful. I have stayed employed, while my wife's employment has been sporadic. We are fortunate enough to have a decent nest egg in savings accounts, and food, paying bills was never an issue. On my whinny selfish side I had a lame metal detecting season due to societal covid isolation restrictions. So poor little baby me only got two gold rings in lakes this year. My wife and I usually do a secret Santa thing for a family every xmas. This year we loaded up the local woman's shelter with food and gifts (there are often small children with mothers). We are not millionaires but have a comfortable enough living. And seeing that both of us had hellacious childhoods, worked on self development and personal recovery, and put ourselves through post secondary educations, we have deep gratitude for life's simple blessings. I find the biggest challenge right now is to remember that we are all under social stress and that some are quietly suffering at a deeper level. The few acts of anonymous kindness that I engage in like the woman's shelter, is my/our effort to reduce the present societal pain and struggle, if even for a day. Having a touchy go with Covid has only made my wife/some friends/myself closer. Best to you all this coming year.
     
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