Axe, Tomahawk & Hatchet Photo Thread

Discussion in 'Axe, Tomahawk, & Hatchet Forum' started by Wood Splitter, Mar 31, 2012.

  1. - SpyderMan -

    - SpyderMan - Gold Member Gold Member

    761
    Mar 28, 2015
    [​IMG]
     
    FOG2, Agent_H, walkbyfaith777 and 6 others like this.
  2. AxeMe

    AxeMe

    15
    Jan 15, 2020
    Nice!
    Any idea why a Kelly Axe Works (Connecticut pattern?) would be pinned? Just scored it in a hoard a local RI guy posted on Facebook and was quite surprised to see that while sanding.
     
    Miller '72 likes this.
  3. Miller '72

    Miller '72

    Jul 25, 2017
    The head would be pinned to keep it from slipping off the handle, used often in competition, timber sports.
     
  4. mndart

    mndart Gold Member Gold Member

    Apr 16, 2004
    I have been spending as much time as I can hiking and trekking over the last 4 years and am developing more of a bush crafting mentality. I decided I wanted a small pack axe and a small fixed blade in my kit/on my back. Based on many written and video reviews of various axes, I settled on this GB Small Forest Axe. I know the Gransfors Bruks has mixed reception from some, but for my simple needs in the bush, I think it will do me just fine.
    GransforsBruks_SFA.jpeg
     
  5. Coastal Curmudgeon

    Coastal Curmudgeon

    5
    Feb 7, 2020
    New to forum (and new to axes), and recently picked up throwing axes. Armed with dangerously little knowledge, I've bought, broke, and/or hung these hatchets. Not gonna win any style points and have probably made a few rookie mistakes but managed to get snug fits. Any input as to the vintage/history of these would be appreciated. Also any tips to improve the heads or rehanging them when they break are welcome.[​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  6. Coastal Curmudgeon

    Coastal Curmudgeon

    5
    Feb 7, 2020
    Not sure if photo links worked. Here's a test.
    [​IMG]
     
  7. Yankee Josh

    Yankee Josh Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 31, 2018
    Here's the only link that worked for me.
    Screenshot_20200207-175303_Photos.jpg
    Can't see much of your hangs in that photo. But I'll take your word for it that they are snug! Have you been throwing at a bar or in your back yard?
    I don't throw anymore myself. I did years back but have moved on to other hobbies.
     
    Meek1 likes this.
  8. Coastal Curmudgeon

    Coastal Curmudgeon

    5
    Feb 7, 2020
    Yeah so the photo linking is on par with my hanging. That photo had a couple with original handles - a Dunlap and a Plumb. The other I hung is a Grove tool works NYC with 211 stamp that I'm curious about. Throws well tho. Here's a couple others - another plumb and a Vaughn.
    [​IMG]
     
  9. Coastal Curmudgeon

    Coastal Curmudgeon

    5
    Feb 7, 2020
    Yankee Josh likes this.
  10. Yankee Josh

    Yankee Josh Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 31, 2018
    Well at least the link worked for me this time! Here I'll put em up for ya. You'll have to use an image hosting website and copy n paste it. Two of the photos were too large for me to post directly to the site but I'll post the ones I can.
    Screenshot_20200207-235346_Photos.jpg Screenshot_20200207-235357_Photos.jpg Screenshot_20200207-235417_Photos.jpg
     
    ithinkverydeeply and Meek1 like this.
  11. AxeMe

    AxeMe

    15
    Jan 15, 2020
    Cool & thank you!
     
    Miller '72 likes this.
  12. ZamoraMCMLXXIX

    ZamoraMCMLXXIX

    4
    Feb 27, 2020
    Just started a thread for these photos. My son is very new to this hobby and forum. Does anyone know what company the marking represents?

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2020
    walkbyfaith777 and FOG2 like this.
  13. disduster

    disduster Gold Member Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Gold Member

    873
    Oct 18, 2007
    Finally got a chance to use this tool and What A Hammer! Reground no name 8lb maul on 30" racing handle i posted before. Next to a helko werk Saxon spiltter. My favorite cord wood tool. Made a copy of the over strike guard with some standing seam roof cutoffs to boot. Just used it on some small walnut rounds but it's a beast. Can't wait to use this on some large gnarly oak rounds. RACING MAUL!
    [​IMG]IMG_1074 by Ian Hockensmith, on Flickr
    [​IMG]IMG_1075 by Ian Hockensmith, on Flickr
    [​IMG]IMG_1076 by Ian Hockensmith, on Flickr
     
  14. Yankee Josh

    Yankee Josh Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 31, 2018
    That's a damn smart idea with the guard. Sometimes I'm embarrassed when I see something so obvious that I should have thought of myself but didn't... Haha. Happens with small new inventions too. I'm like "aghhhh why didn't I think of that"! Lol. Nice looking splitting mauls man!
     
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  15. disduster

    disduster Gold Member Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Gold Member

    873
    Oct 18, 2007
    I was unsure at first with the idea of putting holes in the handle. But the helko has been put through its paces, bout 10 cords and the guard has held up great. The racing maul screws are in about 5/16 and countersunk flush, 24 gauge galvanized steel. Should hold up great. Think I'll do it on my felling and bucking axes as well. Thanks for comments
     
    Yankee Josh likes this.
  16. Ernest DuBois

    Ernest DuBois

    Mar 2, 2013
    The risk of pinning these guards is not weakening or directly damaging the handle, they are conduits drawing moisture into the wood through condensation which poses a long-term risk. In addition the guards themselves on the inward surface can be a source of condensation and trapping moisture against the wood.
     
    Square_peg, Yankee Josh and disduster like this.
  17. disduster

    disduster Gold Member Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Gold Member

    873
    Oct 18, 2007
    Makes sense. Thanks for the input.
     
    Yankee Josh likes this.
  18. Yankee Josh

    Yankee Josh Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 31, 2018
    An advantage to using screws for attachment then is that you could remove it when not in use. And I wonder if a thin piece of leather under the metal guard would be a sufficient moisture barrier?
     
    walkbyfaith777 and disduster like this.
  19. disduster

    disduster Gold Member Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Gold Member

    873
    Oct 18, 2007
    That thought occurred to me as well. I would think leather would hold moisture even more. Something synthetic would be best I would think. Thin breathable neoprene or something. Either way I not to worried about. My tools stay in the shed when not in use. Subject to atmospheric humidity but I can live with that. Even in the eastern woodland foot of a mountain my place is at. Gets damn humid here sometimes. Ha
     

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