Big Boar on the Trap Line

Discussion in 'Becker Knife & Tool' started by coote, Aug 9, 2018.

  1. coote

    coote

    Apr 3, 2006
    Howdy. It's been a while. I still enjoy my BK9s thanks.

    Here's a pic of the last boar I caught on a neighbour's property.

    [​IMG]

    After many nights of empty traps, I was pleased to hear noises in the undergrowth as I walked along the trapline. I was carrying my little Rossi .22 LR single shot.... a safe, light rifle and ideal for a trapping tool (you will see that I apply tape over the muzzle to stop junk and rain getting into the barrel).

    Generally a trapped boar of any size will lunge at me when I get close. I had my rifle ready. From a safe distance, I could see that the boar was caught on the back leg which is a bit unusual. Mostly they seem to get caught by the front leg. When it saw me it gave a mighty lunge downhill... not in my direction thank goodness. The snare cord snapped and it was gone.

    I was philosophical about the loss. There were several more traps I hadn't yet checked, and it was good that there was finally some hog activity in the area that I have access to. And I was lucky... if the pig had charged at me, neither a 40 grain .22 bullet or a BK9 were the ideal means to prevent a collision. And because I do not generally use locks on my snares, it was likely that the noose would have dropped off after a short time. The noose was made from soft braided nylon cord with a breaking load of maybe 550 pounds.

    I walked further along the track and heard more crashing. I crept along the trail and found another big black hog caught in a neck snare. I shot it immediately and it dropped on the spot. Then I saw the broken noose on the back leg. It was the same boar. The neck snare had closed partly over the face of the boar.... I guess it was a bit small for this big animal to get his whole head through.

    Best wishes from New Zealand, Stephen Coote.
     
    Don W, Rebel Nimrod, Aikiguy and 10 others like this.
  2. danny.k

    danny.k

    590
    Jan 29, 2017
    Great to have you back!
    Nice boarcatch :thumbsup:
     
  3. danny.k

    danny.k

    590
    Jan 29, 2017
    That hog has got "white socks" on him... Got one just like that about 10 years ago.. Wierd :eek:
     
  4. Ethan Becker

    Ethan Becker Moderator Moderator

    Sep 1, 1999
    Very Nice.... it should eat well.....As Always, Thanks for the update on your adventures...........All Best.....E
     
  5. danny.k

    danny.k

    590
    Jan 29, 2017
    [​IMG]
     
  6. Roguer

    Roguer

    927
    Jan 5, 2015
    To paraphrase some one when the topic of feral hogs came up.

    "The only Good Hog, is DEAD and BACON HOG if its eat-able that is!"

    Good job helping the neighbor out!
     
  7. coote

    coote

    Apr 3, 2006
    Thanks for the replies!

    Yep, this pig does have white socks. Its body shape is also a bit different to the classic 'Captain Cooker' wild pig that we might expect to find. Some of our wild pigs are referred to as 'Captain Cookers' because it is believed that Captain Cook released pigs when he landed here in the late 1700s. I assume that the variation in colour and shape is due to escaped or released domestic pigs mixing with the wild population. I would not be surprised if the ancestors of this pig were released by a hunter wanting to improve his harvest.

    Here are pics of a couple of other pigs caught in the same area:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  8. Roguer

    Roguer

    927
    Jan 5, 2015
    Bacon mmmmm.... :thumbsup:
     
    GeofS likes this.
  9. DerekH

    DerekH Handsome According to my Mother Moderator

    Nov 18, 2010
    Nicely done!
     
  10. Tanker 1/66

    Tanker 1/66 Gold Member Gold Member

    May 18, 2015
    coote you don't show up often but when you do your like a really good book. Can't read it fast enough, its always to short, and it leaves you wanting more. Thanks Stephen
     
    Aikiguy and GeofS like this.

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