Buck went along

Discussion in 'Buck Knives' started by David Martin, Nov 16, 2020.

  1. David Martin

    David Martin Moderator Moderator

    Apr 7, 2008
    OH, I like it. The 307 Wrangler is a good model for small game. You are well equipped for a day afield. Throw in some summer sausage, cheese, crackers & a apple. Yumm. DM
     
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  2. David Martin

    David Martin Moderator Moderator

    Apr 7, 2008
    Desmobob, those are nice shotguns.
    Longbow, I carry my 317 in a sheath on my belt. I like the size, grinds, 2 blades and it has a lanyard hole. Which I'll tie a leather in. DM
     
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  3. pjsjr

    pjsjr Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 2, 2005
    @David Martin and @longbow1968
    I have both the Kabar 1184 and the Buck 317 so I put them side by side, about as good a comparison as I could come up with. My 1184 looks older and more used than longbow1968's, the skinner looks to be slimmer. I have always called the secondary blade a skinner.
    [​IMG]
     
  4. David Martin

    David Martin Moderator Moderator

    Apr 7, 2008
    @pjsjr , nice picture. Have you read that Camillus also made the Kabar? The Skinner blade on those 2 look real close. DM
     
  5. pjsjr

    pjsjr Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 2, 2005
    David, I bought that knife several years ago. I read up on the history of it...long storied history.
    From Wikipedia...
    Manufacturers and the "Ka-Bar" name[edit]
    Camillus Cutlery Co., the first and largest manufacturer to supply the knife, produced over 1 million with "Camillus.N.Y." on the knife's crossguard.[2] Besides Camillus, the Union Cutlery Co., Robeson (ShurEdge) Cutlery Co., and PAL Cutlery Co. produced the Ka-Bar knife under military contract during World War II.[22]

    After the end of World War II, Utica Cutlery Co., Conetta Cutlery Co., Camillus, and, around 1980, Ontario Knife Co., all produced the knife under contract for the U.S. military.[2] From 1945-1952, Weske Cutlery Co. of Sandusky, Ohio, purchased leftover and overrun parts from wartime knife contractors and assembled them for commercial sale, polishing out manufacturer and military markings, and fitting them with ungrooved leather handles.[23] Though W.R. Case made two prototype Ka-Bar knives as part of a contract submission in 1942-43, no contract was ever awarded to Case for the production of the knife. In 1992, Case would release a modern commemorative of these prototypes, the Case XX USMC Fighting Utility Knife. The Case knife is actually manufactured for Case by Ontario Knife Co.[citation needed]

    The originator of the KA-BAR trademark, Union Cutlery Co, began using the name in 1923,[24] having received a letter from a fur trapper who had used the knife to kill a wounded bear which attacked him when his rifle jammed.[25] According to company records, the letter was only partially legible; "ka bar" could be read, as fragments of the phrase "kill a bear".[25][26][14][15][16][27] In 1923, the company adopted the name Ka-Bar from the "bear story" as its trademark.[24][25] From 1923, the KA-BAR trademark was used as a ricasso stamp by Union Cutlery Co. on its line of automatic switchblade pocket knives, including the KA-BAR Grizzly, KA-BAR Baby Grizzly, and KA-BAR Model 6110 Lever Release knives.[28] The company produced about 1 million knives with the trademark on the ricasso.[2] By 1944, Marines began referring to the knife as the "KA-BAR", regardless of manufacturer.[18][29] The popular designation of the knife may also have resulted from contact with Marine Corps close combat instructors in San Diego, who used the name when training recruits.[18] To capitalize on the popularity, Union Cutlery changed its name to Ka-Bar Cutlery Inc. in 1952. [2]
     
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  6. David Martin

    David Martin Moderator Moderator

    Apr 7, 2008
    Very good! Great history and research... DM
     
  7. st8yd

    st8yd Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 6, 2009
    Im no aficionado, but nothing about that second blade looks like a clip point. I do not have one but i did sharpen my late Uncles for him as he said he never could get it sharp. However as i recall that blade seemed rellatively thin and i remember thinking it would do pretty well (for a pocket knife) on fish and also boning.
     
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  8. David Martin

    David Martin Moderator Moderator

    Apr 7, 2008
    st8yd, the determination for classifying as a clip point is the grind drops below the start of the spine. And runs to the point. ThuS, forming a clip. You can see it in this photo with a straight edge placed at it's spine. DM
    20210215_203330.jpg
     
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  9. David Martin

    David Martin Moderator Moderator

    Apr 7, 2008
    I will acknowledge that some mfg. of this pattern / model give this blade a straight spine. Thus, making it a trailing point. So, there are variations of this blade among mfg.. DM
     
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  10. David Martin

    David Martin Moderator Moderator

    Apr 7, 2008
    Today we are having quail. Fruits of my labor. DM
    20210306_124645.jpg
     
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  11. David Martin

    David Martin Moderator Moderator

    Apr 7, 2008
    It's Brushcetta. Made with wild rice, onions, bell pepper and olive oil. Then put the quail in the dish & in the oven. Yumm... DM
     
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  12. sportingspecialist

    sportingspecialist

    Dec 11, 2014
    I'm coming to your house for dinner,David.LOL
     
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  13. David Martin

    David Martin Moderator Moderator

    Apr 7, 2008
    We'll set another plate... I think You'll enjoy it. DM
     
  14. Lesknife

    Lesknife Platinum Member Platinum Member

    Mar 31, 2018
    I enjoy seeing the pictures of your adventures afield David, the quail reminds me of my youth growing up on a farm and ranch. We had a big covey of scaled quail around our place and a huge dead fall of old trees they roosted in and milo fields nearby to sage brush pasture down over the rim of the Cimarron river valley. I was about 12 yo when I settled in and matured enough that my dad let me go hunting. That’s when I also paid more attention to knives and firearms and how valuable they were for hunting game. My first real hunt was for quail and I got about 7-8 with a single shot 410 my dad had used when he was young. I had a medium size old timer stockman I used for dressing the quail and rabbits. I had a yearning for a bigger knife like your jumbo trapper but never was able to acquire one. Editing for fat finger mishaps. Lol
     
  15. David Martin

    David Martin Moderator Moderator

    Apr 7, 2008
    Our boyhood roamings parallel. I had a Stevens single shot 20 ga. and thought I could down Bigfoot with it. I found it did better on quail, rabbits and squirrels...
    When my dogs found a raccoon, I thought it was a bear. I carried a stockman as well. DM
     
  16. RAZORBLADES

    RAZORBLADES

    Aug 14, 2006
    Always love your hunting and food prep photos David,thanks a lot for sharing them.I recently lost my favorite old 307 and I've looked about as hard I can with no luck.This makes the 3rd knife Ive lost in my life,and I'm 48. I'll find another im sure .Its funny you mention summer sausage,I'm making venison summer sausage in the smokehouse tomorrow.lol
     
  17. David Martin

    David Martin Moderator Moderator

    Apr 7, 2008
    That's good eating. Show a photo as your making it and we'll get hungry and then we'll be envious.
    Summer sausage, apples and cheese for lunch has kept me from going hungry. DM
     
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