Constructive criticism welcome

Discussion in 'Shop Talk - BladeSmith Questions and Answers' started by Harley Boatman, Aug 20, 2020.

  1. Harley Boatman

    Harley Boatman

    27
    Jun 21, 2020
    Hello everyone, hope your day is going well!

    I just finished sanding my first satin blade and wanted your thoughts on it. Ways to improve, what to do different, etc.

    I read after I had already heat treated the blade that it's easier to do all the hand sanding before heat treat while the steel is still soft, but it is what it is. I sanded at 120, 220, 400, 600, 800, and back to 600. The last 600 I used a block with a piece of leather glued on and sanded in one direction, pulling towards and then off the tip.

    (I still haven't figured out how to attach photos on here, so heres links to the photos on dropbox)
    https://www.dropbox.com/s/bdcjv27o4870dlr/Satin1.jpg?dl=0
    https://www.dropbox.com/s/294wg1h98rk3s7g/Satin2.jpg?dl=0
    https://www.dropbox.com/s/413flt272u008as/Satin3.jpg?dl=0
    https://www.dropbox.com/s/nt38tcvcc79ntyz/Satin4.jpg?dl=0
    https://www.dropbox.com/s/nntkqcfgi6xnpfy/Satin5.jpg?dl=0
     
    Hengelo_77 likes this.
  2. Stacy E. Apelt - Bladesmith

    Stacy E. Apelt - Bladesmith ilmarinen - MODERATOR Moderator Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Aug 20, 2004
    Looks good.
    From the small handle size I'm guessing it will receive a paracord handle?
     
    GABaus likes this.
  3. Drew Riley

    Drew Riley Riley Knife and Tool

    Oct 17, 2007
    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
    GABaus likes this.
  4. Drew Riley

    Drew Riley Riley Knife and Tool

    Oct 17, 2007
    Looks pretty good as far as I can see. If you're leaving the handle as is, I'd lighten up on the chamfers next time. Looks like you've got a little bit of chatter, and sometimes less is more. A wood dowel shaped to the same profile as your countersink can be used with a little bit of polishing compound polish your chamfers after heat treat. Also, I'd break the corners of your handle just a bit as well. A little chamfer or round over around the perimeter will make it 100x more comfortable in the hand. Even if you're gonna cord wrap it, I'd break the edges. Looks like you missed a couple of spots/didn't go deep enough on the flats of the handle.

    If you're putting scales on, disregard the previous advice.
     
    Sharp & Fiery likes this.
  5. drew1972

    drew1972

    179
    Oct 17, 2015
    The sanding lines are nice a straight with no start/stop marks. That's good but your grind lines look washed out. Not sure what your using as a backer for your paper but make sure it's flat and hard. And make sure your paper is pulled tight around it.
     
  6. Harley Boatman

    Harley Boatman

    27
    Jun 21, 2020
    You're right. My grind lines were decent until the last step when I used the leather backed sanding block. I have no idea why the leather is needed. Just going off the advice I've read and videos I've watched. On every other step of sanding I used a 6x2 piece of plywood as my sanding block.
     
  7. Harley Boatman

    Harley Boatman

    27
    Jun 21, 2020
    I used Gcarta for the scales. I had to grind the screws I had to nearly half the size, but I was able to get it to work. I ended up glueing the scales on in addition to the screws. Still have to sharpen and make the sheath but here's how it turned out-
    https://www.dropbox.com/s/si85xtx30i68hbh/Satin6.jpg?dl=0
    https://www.dropbox.com/s/n89a4kvnsiksbze/Satin7.jpg?dl=0
     
    Lee Hester likes this.
  8. Drew Riley

    Drew Riley Riley Knife and Tool

    Oct 17, 2007
    Nicely done. I like that!
     
    Harley Boatman likes this.
  9. drew1972

    drew1972

    179
    Oct 17, 2015
    No need for leather if everything is flat or your not worried about keeping your lines crisp. If your doing a full height grind or a plungeless chefs knife you can get away with leather.
     
    Harley Boatman likes this.
  10. 12345678910

    12345678910

    Jul 13, 2009
    [​IMG]

    To my eye, the screws are way too large and out of proportion.
     
    Bamph likes this.
  11. Harley Boatman

    Harley Boatman

    27
    Jun 21, 2020
    I had worried about that. These were the only stainless screws I had and were actually originally larger than what they are in the picture. As they are in the picture, they're a tad bit under 5/16". If I were to trim them down further for future knives, or order a stainless rod for pins, what size would you say would be the best proportionally?
     
  12. imill3567

    imill3567 KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    207
    Aug 5, 2014
    On a knife that small 1/8” pins would be fine or 3/16” but those are good sizes to get if you’re ordering pin stock, in my opinion. Pins can be a matter of opinion as to what looks best.
     
  13. 12345678910

    12345678910

    Jul 13, 2009

    https://www.microfasteners.com/home.php?cat=622

    I think the smaller the better.
    too small still looks ok, too large is really visible.
     
    TheEdge01 and Harley Boatman like this.
  14. scott kozub

    scott kozub Basic Member Basic Member

    703
    Jan 1, 2018
    Hand sanding looks great. Very good lines.

    The pin holes do look large. If you're putting on scales, maybe consider thong tubes instead of solid pins. They won't look as big and could be a neat look with a clean crisp chamfer.
     
  15. Harley Boatman

    Harley Boatman

    27
    Jun 21, 2020
    When you say thong tubes do you mean the hollow tubes used as pins? I've seen those on knife supply websites but I don't think I've seen any on a completed knife.
     
  16. scott kozub

    scott kozub Basic Member Basic Member

    703
    Jan 1, 2018
    That's correct. Hollow tubes. bark-river-psk-elmax-green-canvas-micarta-hollow-189.95__18023.1546447033.jpg
     
    Harley Boatman and TheEdge01 like this.
  17. scott kozub

    scott kozub Basic Member Basic Member

    703
    Jan 1, 2018
    Also if you want to use smaller pins you can. It's ok for the pin to be smaller than the hole. The gap will be filled with epoxy.
     
    TheEdge01 and Harley Boatman like this.
  18. TheEdge01

    TheEdge01

    Apr 3, 2015
    Something else to consider, especially if you are going with wooden scales or Micarta, is wooden dowel rods. They are cheap, easy to find, and come in a variety of shapes and sizes. I’ve used them and they work great for handle pins.
     
    Harley Boatman likes this.

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