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Cult of the peanut , members

Discussion in 'Traditional Folders and Fixed Blades' started by jacktrades_nbk, Mar 2, 2012.

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  1. PaulS.

    PaulS. Basic Member Basic Member

    216
    Jul 16, 2018
    Edit: Removed. Doh! I didn't realize what thread i was in. Sorry.
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2019
  2. Henry Beige

    Henry Beige Gold Member Gold Member

    Jun 1, 2015
    This kit was assembled a couple of years ago when we were talking about a minimalist EDC kit. My own pocket has evolved since then, but the Channellock is still there every day.

    8DEA7FD7-08F5-40D4-9651-1347D6321727.jpeg
     
  3. TrapperMike

    TrapperMike Basic Member Basic Member

    401
    Nov 23, 2016
    Very nice. Those little items can do a lot more work than a person thinks. My little wrench adjust up to 9/16 which really covers alot of tasks. Those channel locks look like they would tackle alot them selves. :thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:
     
  4. jackknife

    jackknife

    Oct 2, 2004
    The small Channel Locks are a very versatile tool. Can deal with small nuts and bolts, crimp, handle hot pot handles in camp, bend and unbend stuff. The only bit of kit that I think edges it out is the smallest Vise Grip. The Vise grip has wire cutter capability which can be useful. The choice between the Channel Locks and the little Vise Grip is a personal preference one, as both are good.

    I think that's the reason I never really got into the whole Leatherman thing; just too inefficient and expensive, not to mention heavy and bulky/ Try to get too much out of one object and you get an awkward to use tool. If I'm going to bother carrying pliers, I'll carry real pliers that are not attached to the rest of my kit. How many times have you seen the screw that you need to turn and the nut/bolt in back of it has to be held to keep it from turning? You can't do that with a Leatherman.

    You're little kit there Henry, is just about what all the old guys carried when I was growing and taking notice in the 1950's. They got a heck of a lot of stuff done with a Sear 4-way keychain screw driver, a P-38 can opener, and a pocket knife. Add in the little pliers and you're good for most small repairs/maintenance. For the past several months I've been giving the little Victorinox Quattro a second try. It's smaller than the Sears 4-way, but the two dedicated Phillips bits on it are very well shaped and perform on small Phillips screws better than the Sears, which may be a bit dated as not many flat screws are used anymore.

    To para phrase a famous Mexican actor;

    "Leatherman? We don't need no steenkin' Leatherman's!"

    :D
     
    PaulS. and jacktrades_nbk like this.
  5. Frailer

    Frailer Gold Member Basic Member Gold Member

    383
    Oct 25, 2009
    I hear you. With this--and a small knife--you can get a *lot* done.

    IMG_4093.jpg
     
  6. jackknife

    jackknife

    Oct 2, 2004
    Yeah, the Knipex is a great tool!!!!
     
    jacktrades_nbk likes this.
  7. Henry Beige

    Henry Beige Gold Member Gold Member

    Jun 1, 2015
    Agreed, the Knipex is the gold standard. The jaw works particularly well on hex nuts. It costs close to 30 bucks, and takes a little more room in the pocket. I keep one in my moto tool roll.

    The Tekton 5” plier is a few bucks cheaper than the Channellock, and is noticeably bulkier in the pocket. For me, the Channellock hits the sweet spot on price and size for EDC.
     
  8. TrapperMike

    TrapperMike Basic Member Basic Member

    401
    Nov 23, 2016
    You all make some great points. I have broke several leaterman tools just doing regular type stuff. Those mini channel locks look like they can handle a lot of work. I have a mini pair of slip joint pliers that are okay. They dont open as wide as the channel locks though.
    Great, i was cured of one sickness but now you all have me looking for small tools to go along with my peanut. Thanks alot. :p:D
    I do admit i am a tool junkie though.
     
    jacktrades_nbk likes this.
  9. TheChunk91

    TheChunk91 Basic Member Basic Member

    Aug 15, 2013
    Could you peanut folks tell me if this would meet your 'nut criteria? Does it have to be case to be a proper 'nut?

    This one is technically a dogleg but is the same size as a peanut, with the same blades, and the bone looks kind of like an actual peanut.

    IMG_3163.JPG
     
  10. TrapperMike

    TrapperMike Basic Member Basic Member

    401
    Nov 23, 2016
    [​IMG]
     
  11. TrapperMike

    TrapperMike Basic Member Basic Member

    401
    Nov 23, 2016
    Looks like a great candidate to me. Tell us more about it. Its a beautiful little legume.
     
  12. waverave

    waverave Gold Member Basic Member Gold Member

    Jun 7, 2018
    Nice! That is an amazing knife right there :) It does not have to be a Case to be a peanut. AG Russell has a peanut, for example. As long as the size and shape fits I think that's the only criteria really.
     
    TrapperMike likes this.
  13. Henry Beige

    Henry Beige Gold Member Gold Member

    Jun 1, 2015
    Now that is what a real slipjoint looks like. Snap-Ons yet. I am going to resist the temptation to show my Snap-On metric crescent wrench.

    I have a 4” Thorsen crescent wrench, too, but I don’t carry it because the little Channellocks will handle the same fasteners.
     
    TrapperMike likes this.
  14. TrapperMike

    TrapperMike Basic Member Basic Member

    401
    Nov 23, 2016
    Im going to have to find me a pair of them channel locks.
     
  15. TheChunk91

    TheChunk91 Basic Member Basic Member

    Aug 15, 2013
    Thanks gentlemen. Trapper Mike, it's a schrade cut co most likely from around the 1920's or so. This is one of the bone styles they used before peachseed. I like the thin blades and it has half stops like a case 'nut. The pen blade is bent but it cuts and sharpens up just fine.

    Waverave, the ag russell peanut you speak of is a fine, fine example of a peanut. I would love to have one of those in mammoth, one day.
     
  16. Henry Beige

    Henry Beige Gold Member Gold Member

    Jun 1, 2015
    Thanks for the tip. I should have known there would be a 4” Vise Grip, even though I have never seen one. Well, I have one coming now. I suspect it will prove too bulky for my front pocket but you never know until you try. In any event there are several tool kits here where it will be welcome.
     
    TrapperMike likes this.
  17. TrapperMike

    TrapperMike Basic Member Basic Member

    401
    Nov 23, 2016
    [​IMG]
    I went for the mini vise grips. I looked for small channel locks here werei live and the smallest they had were 7 inches. They were to big for pocket carry. Anyways the vise grips already proved worthy at work today. Like the peanut they do more than a person would expect.
     
  18. jackknife

    jackknife

    Oct 2, 2004
    Heck, with some vise grips, duct tape, and a can of WD-40, they could have limped the Titanic into Halifax!:eek:

    Okay, maybe St. Johns.
    :D
     
  19. JaxBaron

    JaxBaron Gold Member Gold Member

    444
    Jul 4, 2016
    Lol now that’s funny :D
     
    TrapperMike likes this.
  20. TrapperMike

    TrapperMike Basic Member Basic Member

    401
    Nov 23, 2016
    Haha. I new i should have a bought a pocket size can of wd-40. Then i could fix anything for sure. :D
    My grandpa was a big believer in wd-40. I watched him use it to remove water from a distributor on the engine of our combine. The duct tape he kepted in the truck was used to patch holes in the grain bin and wheat truck till we had time to make proper repairs.
     
    jacktrades_nbk and JaxBaron like this.

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