Field Knives in the Kitchen

Discussion in 'General Knife Discussion' started by Murindo, Oct 22, 2020.

  1. Ben Dover

    Ben Dover Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 2, 2006
    The Bark River Kephart is ideal for the "Field kitchen."
     
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  2. Hijo de Luna

    Hijo de Luna Basic Member Basic Member

    330
    Jun 10, 2020
    I have decided I can't stand using anything with 1/8" stock unless it has a really high full flat grind. And even then, I'd rather have 0.100" to 1/16".

    In a knife, 0.100 seems like the idea general purpose, outdoor indoor blade thickness. Trying to avoid thick stock, so I have more reasons to use an axe/hatchet.

    Stock thickness and ease of maintaining a razor edge, next to blade length, and followed by stainlessness, are the more important factors for whether I'm going to use it for any meaningful food prep (perhaps I should add that I don't eat a lot of animal products, and maybe would use thicker knives if I was still cooking ox tail).

    My L.T. Wright Kephart type knife in 1/8" A2 with their scandi grind, while it's an awesome knife, just can't get enough traction with me for kitchen use.

    Big fan of these two: F2 from Fiddleback and 26C3 Cowboy from Horsewright make amazing paring knives, basically handy to have in any situation

    What I'm really exited for is a knife I'm waiting for in 26C3, 0.100" stock and about 5" long. That's going to be really fun to use.
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2020
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  3. Ben Dover

    Ben Dover Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 2, 2006
    Like you, for food prep I like .800 to .100 thickness. In a steel that will handle a 15 degree or less edge.

    The Bark River Keppie at .093 of 3V fits almost perfectly.:thumbsup:
     
  4. guy g

    guy g Gold Member Gold Member

    Oct 22, 2000
    All I use in the kitchen are field knives. I use what I'm carrying and have a Buck 105 and the 692 in the kitchen for larger tasks.
     
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  5. Hijo de Luna

    Hijo de Luna Basic Member Basic Member

    330
    Jun 10, 2020
    hehehe :p

    Even though it's a little thicker than what I normally like for kitchen, I am definitely looking forward to using my 212 in the kitchen. Especially once I get around to sharpening the back of the clip :thumbsup:

    And I'm be very supportive of anyone using a 110 in the kitchen :)

    I used a modified Opinel 8 carbon for dinner. I believe the expression is, cuts like the dickens :cool:
     
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  6. Tx308

    Tx308 Gold Member Gold Member

    172
    Dec 30, 2014
    My Ontario Blackbird is a great kitchen knife, it's a little thick but the blade height and full flat grind make it an excellent slicer. For a sharp table knife and smaller prep knife I have taken to using my Steel will Sedge.
     
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  7. Hijo de Luna

    Hijo de Luna Basic Member Basic Member

    330
    Jun 10, 2020
    The Sedge looks like it would make a great kitchen knife! How serviceable is the Blackbird at, what, 0.13" thick?

    And speaking of Ontario, when I finally get around to purchasing a Rat I or II, that's going to be fun in the kitchen too :thumbsup:

    Sadly most of my knife usage is left to opening mail and bags of cat food, breaking down boxes, using as a worry stone and then the bulk of kitchen use.

    It's going to be soooooo good when I can get out and use the stuff outside :( been too, too long

    But this makes me think, with the trend toward more hard use type blade designs, I wonder how thick the average blade stock of knives used in the field a century plus years ago?
     
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  8. jideta

    jideta Gold Member Gold Member

    Apr 8, 2020
    they didn't live there for long...

    DSC_2875.jpg
     
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  9. HwangJino

    HwangJino

    Dec 2, 2012
    Making some sushi with my giant chopper...

    [​IMG]
     
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  10. marchone

    marchone Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 13, 2013
    Critical point violations. Please clean the machi. Remove the handles. There will be a lot of bacterial crud inside. After visual removal of built up material sanitize with a bleach solution.
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2020
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  11. eveled

    eveled Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 11, 2016
    0A572EAA-F582-4F1E-8A07-853A46B19DCC.jpeg D2DED6DA-9041-44A9-8A56-72EF6F612B7B.jpeg 203D22EA-2F60-467F-85C8-7E46797E9BB6.jpeg 224EDA86-90FA-4B4E-94D7-7F8B51248E49.jpeg 2C9BAD46-7720-4BF7-90D3-0E8E76C7327F.jpeg 7303C346-F814-4926-A123-C4E913EB2213.jpeg 1C474666-959C-4FB7-91B4-19B9539771BE.jpeg 632C992A-93BA-48DA-BF82-259120E6F905.jpeg B31AE360-9906-4285-942E-192BA7C471F0.jpeg 93B71883-B163-4D97-9329-1ACBAB9664C7.jpeg

    I do from time to time for fun. I find I enjoy using kitchen knives more. Making me wonder if they are generally better suited as field knives too.

    I cook in large batches with lots of veggies most field knives are very fatiguing to use this way, plus you end up with more chunky veggies.

    Now using a field knife on a nice cooked steak makes a meal special.
     
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  12. HwangJino

    HwangJino

    Dec 2, 2012
    I didn't actually make any food with the busse. It was getting a sharpening that day ;)
     
  13. marchone

    marchone Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 13, 2013
    The Busse too. I meant the Japanese knives. The handles come off to clean and replace.
     
  14. herisson

    herisson Apple slicing rocking chair dweller Platinum Member

    Mar 11, 2013
    Well, a knife like this will obviously do great in the kitchen. So, I had to buy it for the kitchen. It turns out it is just awesome. So light, easy and precise, it's the new full time resident on the cutting board (for small slicing / mincing jobs) :
    [​IMG]

    Still, fun has to be had. This here under was not the most practical choice but I had a great time preparing that stew :
    [​IMG]
     
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  15. craytab

    craytab Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 26, 2012
    I only use my non-kitchen knives in the kitchen for fun as my dedicated kitchen knives are made for and work really well in the kitchen. We eat at home for 99% of our meals and I cook a lot. Decent kitchen knives are a key in eating good home cooked food for us, I'm not sure how some of you get by without them.

    That said, a few of my field/EDC knives do work pretty good in the kitchen.

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  16. jfk1110

    jfk1110 Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 9, 2013
    Loving that first one! Any info would be appreciated!! Thanx!
    James
     
  17. herisson

    herisson Apple slicing rocking chair dweller Platinum Member

    Mar 11, 2013
    I want the patch knife on extreme left side !
     
  18. jideta

    jideta Gold Member Gold Member

    Apr 8, 2020
    the wharnie or upswept?
     
  19. jfk1110

    jfk1110 Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 9, 2013
    Persian!!
     
  20. brownshoe

    brownshoe I support this site with my MIND

    Sep 6, 2002
    That’s a “subjective” conclusion, not a fact. Blade design is the thing, not whether or not it’s called a kitchen knife. A Benchmade Spike has the same flat grind and blade shape as a paring knife. A folding fishing knife can be better than most kitchen knives for small fish.
     
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