Fighter WIP

Discussion in 'Hammer & Tongs' started by Phillip Patton, Feb 28, 2014.

  1. Phillip Patton

    Phillip Patton KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jul 25, 2005
    Hey all,
    This is my first time posting in this new sub-forum. I like to do at least one WIP a year, and for some reason it seems to be mostly in the winter. :confused:

    Anyway, the knife in question is a recurved fighter like this one: http://www.pattonblades.com/91109-1.jpg but with different materials and a bit longer.

    It's going to be made from a billet of W's damascus, twisted, then laddered. I could show you a picture of what this pattern looks like, but I'd rather save it for later.

    The steels I'm using are 1086M and 15n20. I'm using 1086M because I'm out of 1084. ;) But so far it's welding fine, and I think it'll perform a little better, based on the steels composition.

    I didn't get pictures of the first few steps, but I'm sure most of us have seen it before. I started with a billet of 15 layers, then triple stacked it, adding a couple of layers of 15n20 between the pieces for a total of 47 layers.

    Then I rotated it 90 degrees and drew it out to 16" long. Then cut it into fourths. I ground the pieces clean and etched so you can see the layers:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Now it's stacked, tack welded together, forge welded, and drawn out to 16" long.

    [​IMG]


    I use oil instead of borax for welding now. This is a pot I made for holding the oil:

    [​IMG]


    For this kind of welding, you need a pretty reducing atmosphere in your forge. This is how the flame looks like coming out of mine:

    [​IMG]


    When I used borax, I judged when the billet was ready to squash by how the flux looked. Now I go by the color of the billet.

    [​IMG]

    In this pic, you can see that it's still a little dark in the middle:

    [​IMG]

    Once the color is about the same as the interior of the forge, I wait a few more minutes. Now it's ready:

    [​IMG]


    I usually do a follow-up weld with borax, just to make sure the edges of the seams close up. Here it is after the second pass:

    [​IMG]


    After welding, it's drawn out to 16" again, cut into 4ths, ground clean, and welded, two more times.


    To be continued...
     
  2. Salem Straub

    Salem Straub

    Oct 20, 2008
    Awesome! I had just opined the other day in your old fighter WIP thread that I wished you'd do some more WIP threads around here. Even better is that you're doing a W's variation- laddered W's is probably the next new pattern I want to mess with. Needless to say, I'll be enjoying watching this one unfold.
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2014
  3. Kentucky

    Kentucky

    Dec 13, 2008
    Great, glad to see another great WIP..Also, I really like the 1086M..Im working on a bowie/fighter in it right now..Its a great steel.
     
  4. Cody Hofsommer

    Cody Hofsommer

    913
    Dec 2, 2011
    I always love a good WIP. One that you did years ago influenced me more then you can imagine. I learn so much, and was inspired to try to do the same. Thank you for doing that one , and this one also.
     
  5. Stacy E. Apelt - Bladesmith

    Stacy E. Apelt - Bladesmith ilmarinen - MODERATOR Moderator Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Aug 20, 2004
    Thanks Phil, I look forward to watching this as it progresses.
     
  6. Salem Straub

    Salem Straub

    Oct 20, 2008
    What kind of oil are you using, Phillip?
     
  7. Phillip Patton

    Phillip Patton KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jul 25, 2005
    Vet grade mineral oil, since it's what I have. I guess some people don't use anything. I'll try that sometime, but not on this project....
     
  8. Phillip Patton

    Phillip Patton KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jul 25, 2005
    Which thread was that? You're welcome in either case. :)
     
  9. Cody Hofsommer

    Cody Hofsommer

    913
    Dec 2, 2011
    It was one you had put on iforgeiron.com it had an ironwood handle and was Gordian knot Damascus, I think
     
  10. Phillip Patton

    Phillip Patton KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jul 25, 2005
    Ok, here's the pattern after the first W's stack:

    [​IMG]


    After the second stack:

    [​IMG]


    After the third stack, it's forged out to a bit less than an inch square:

    [​IMG]


    Then it's forged more or less round, except the ends, where the vise and wrench grip it when twisting:

    [​IMG]


    The vise and wrench:

    [​IMG]


    After twisting. I usually go with one twist per inch, so since the blade is going to be 9" long, I twisted it 9 times, and then one more time right at the tip end, since that's going to be drawn out some, which will make the twist look less tight. I twisted it clockwise, but either way works.

    [​IMG]


    Since this blade is going be laddered also, I have to leave it pretty thick for now. It's about half an inch thick. I also pre-formed the blade shape a bit, so the pattern won't be so distorted later.

    [​IMG]
     
  11. Salem Straub

    Salem Straub

    Oct 20, 2008
    Thanks for the update Phillip. The pattern in the end of that bar is looking real good. Can't wait to see it after laddering out.
     
  12. Cody Hofsommer

    Cody Hofsommer

    913
    Dec 2, 2011
    Good stuff, how many heats did it take to get all the twisting?

    On a side note, I've been thinking of making a socket to fit a certain size square bar, and the using a ratchet to twist. Might work slick!
     
  13. Phillip Patton

    Phillip Patton KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jul 25, 2005
    Four heats, total, to do all the twisting.

    Yes, that could work. Let us know!
     
  14. Grayzer86

    Grayzer86

    Jan 15, 2012
    A friend of mine picked up a huge power threader for pipe for dirt cheap at an auction and has been using it for twisting. Super slick.
     
  15. gudspelr

    gudspelr

    449
    Jul 1, 2013
    I don't know how I missed this until now. Thanks for posting, I love WIPs like this.

    Jeremy
     
  16. ron finkbeiner jr

    ron finkbeiner jr Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 6, 2012
    I have always wanted to make knife in the fashion in which you make yours. I think it would be so very satisfying.
     
  17. Phillip Patton

    Phillip Patton KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jul 25, 2005
    Well, getting paid is satisfying anyway. ;)
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2014
  18. Mack

    Mack Expert Ultracrepidarian Platinum Member

    Aug 19, 2007
    Something tells me that this is going to be good. Really good.
     
  19. Phillip Patton

    Phillip Patton KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jul 25, 2005
    OK, the next step is to grind the ladder grooves. First, layout. I spaced them 1/2" apart, off-setting them on the two sides.

    [​IMG]

    In the vise. You definitely want to wear a respirator for this.

    [​IMG]

    I use a 4" angle grinder with a 3/16" wheel. The wheel is shaped with a diamond so it makes a round groove.

    [​IMG]

    One side done:

    [​IMG]

    Both sides done:

    [​IMG]
     
  20. Phillip Patton

    Phillip Patton KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jul 25, 2005
    Next, forging. I forge it out width-wise first, so I know it will be wide enough right off the bat, then I can forge it to the length and thickness needed. There was just enough material...

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

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    After the blade is forged to shape (I'm not forging the bevels in, because cutting into the layers when grinding is a big part of bringing the pattern out) it's cut off the re-bar, and the tang is forged out:

    [​IMG]

    and the blade is thermal cycled once or twice, just so there won't be any problems as it cools. I'll be thermal cycling it with my oven when I've got a few more blades to do.

    [​IMG]
     

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