Filework on full length of spine

Discussion in 'Shop Talk - BladeSmith Questions and Answers' started by Tyson A Wright, Aug 27, 2020.

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  1. Tyson A Wright

    Tyson A Wright Basic Member Basic Member

    78
    Jun 9, 2020
    Hello all - it seems common to fill the cutouts from filework on the back of the handle with black-dyed epoxy. When the filework starts on the back of the blade, and continues to the back of the handle, how do you handle the cutouts that cross the front edge of the scales?

    I can see leaving those unfilled, or somehow filling only the part that's behind the handle (although I'm not sure how to do that). I'm specifically interested in how people have solved this problem with vine-and-thorn patterns, but would welcome approaches used with any filework pattern.

    Pictures of knives you've made that deal with this always welcome! :)

    Thanks,

    -Tyson
     
  2. Hengelo_77

    Hengelo_77 Basic Member Basic Member

    Mar 2, 2006
    Arrange the file work so that it ends/starts exactly where the scales will end.
    Mark that spot and start forewards and backwards from that point
     
  3. Tyson A Wright

    Tyson A Wright Basic Member Basic Member

    78
    Jun 9, 2020
    There's no point in vine and thorn that doesn't have a cutout on one or the other side. So I think you're suggesting that, instead of a continuous flowing vine all the way down the spine, have some stopping point, and the vine goes on either side of it? Or maybe I'm not picturing what you're saying - can you clarify, please? Thanks!
     
  4. WValtakis

    WValtakis Hand Engraving, Anodizing and Embellishment Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    May 29, 2004
    Personally, I prefer my handle filework unfilled... I've always picked out the epoxy when its still in the rubbery stage.
     
  5. Tyson A Wright

    Tyson A Wright Basic Member Basic Member

    78
    Jun 9, 2020
    I like how that looks, too, and it seems like it would potentially improve the grip (like better-looking jimping) but I have a few questions about that:

    1. I'm concerned that the cutouts will get filled with gunk - obviously it can be cleaned, but it just seems like a potential hassle on a user knife. (I don't assume that filework prevents a knife from also being a user.) It seems like the cutouts will have higher potential for corrosion on a non-stainless blade because of this. What's your experience with this?

    2. Probably a bigger issue is: I don't know how to do this. (Of course, I don't know how to do anything in knife making, and it hasn't stopped me from trying yet. :D) Do you put something on the cutout - grease or wax or something - prior to glue-up? Or is it really as simple as just picking the epoxy out before it's fully hardened? Do you use a toothpick?

    Thanks for your help!

    -Tyson
     
  6. WValtakis

    WValtakis Hand Engraving, Anodizing and Embellishment Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    May 29, 2004
    1. Pretty much spot on, but I can't usually just blow the gunk out with some canned air. Corrosion with carbon steel could be a problem if not maintained, but thats true for the whole knife.

    2. Yup, just pick it out when it's rubbery...I usually use dental picks.
     
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  7. AVigil

    AVigil Adam Vigil knifemaker working the grind Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Platinum Member

    Feb 17, 2009
    After gluing scales wipe down with on a rag to remove excess.
    Then get your air gun on your compressor and blow out the epoxy in the file work.
    Then use a cotton swab and tooth pick to finish.
    Blowing it out works well.
     
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  8. Hengelo_77

    Hengelo_77 Basic Member Basic Member

    Mar 2, 2006
    Grease parts where you don't want epoxy to adhere. It makes removing easier
     
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  9. MT Borg

    MT Borg

    218
    Jun 14, 2007
    If the knife will be used in food prepairation, gunk in the file work recesses will harbor bacteria. I always fill any voids, including in the scales because of this. I just dopnt think most knife users would be aware/cautious about keeping the knife clean beyond the blade.
     
  10. Stacy E. Apelt - Bladesmith

    Stacy E. Apelt - Bladesmith ilmarinen - MODERATOR Moderator Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Aug 20, 2004
    Food perp knives are not the right blade for fully file worked spines.

    Simple rope down the open spine is the most that should be done, and even that is not really desirable on a culinary knife.
     

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