... for cutting only limes

Discussion in 'General Knife Discussion' started by bigsurbob, Sep 21, 2020.

  1. JokersFaceLifter

    JokersFaceLifter

    302
    Jan 6, 2016
    a knife with some flex wouldn't hurt either, it looks like you have plenty of helpful advice to sift through, AEB-L is a good choice, people think of it like "stain-less carbon steel" as it sharpens really easy and holds a decent edge for a time
     
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  2. number9

    number9

    421
    Mar 5, 2017
    [​IMG]

    Jackson Cannon Bar Knife, by R. Murphy Knives

    from the website:
    420HC High Carbon Stainless Steel
    Vacuum Infused Cocobolo Handle
    The blade is precision ground, hand edged and honed resulting in a superior, long-lasting razor sharp cutting edge.
    Full tang is triple brass riveted to the handle, providing strength, perfect weight and balance.
    Contoured handle is hand polished and designed for comfort.
    Stabilized Cocobolo, a tropical hardwood known for its beauty and durability, contains natural oils that resist wet environments.
    Cryogenically treated blade substantially increases edge retention.
     
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  3. bigsurbob

    bigsurbob Gold Member Gold Member

    Jun 10, 2016
    Ok... AEB-L. I like the fact that its easy to sharpen. It's got M390 beat there i guess.
    I love the tip profile of that knife. Perfect for cutting that slit that allows you to hang the slice on the rim of the glass. Great looking knife.
     
  4. Silent H

    Silent H

    935
    Feb 1, 2018
    I've been using my White River Knucklehead II as my bar knife lately. It's S35VN with a bottle opener on the back, and has cut limes, lemons, and oranges for the last several months with no issues. S35VN is tough enough when it encounters a seed, and holds a good edge. It's sat out for a day or two with citrus juice on it with no issue.

    Otherwise I use a victorinox paring knife, or whatever is in my pocket (usually that's sharper than my friends' kitchen knives)

    ETA quick pic:

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2020
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  5. bigsurbob

    bigsurbob Gold Member Gold Member

    Jun 10, 2016
    Yes encountering seeds can be rough. I've found that a sharp plain edge cuts through while serrated can grab the seed and bring it along on the next cut... which is how I cut that disc off my thumb and learned about liquid stitches.
     
  6. DocJD

    DocJD

    Jan 29, 2016
    :) Unless encountered in the wild under survival conditions , most lime cutting is accomplished in the kitchen . :rolleyes:

    I cut my limes and lemons either in the kitchen sink or right next to , on the counter .

    Hot and cold running water , and even dish detergent is very handy . So is an oval diamond sharpening rod .

    So almost any kitchen knife that's not to big will work just fine . Wash , rinse , sharpen as needed . :cool::thumbsup::thumbsup:
     
  7. bigsurbob

    bigsurbob Gold Member Gold Member

    Jun 10, 2016
    Right. So any kitchen knife. Not too big.
     
  8. DocJD

    DocJD

    Jan 29, 2016
    :) Yup ! You don't need nothin' real special .

    I do prefer a small bird's beck paring knife for this . It's some kind of stainless . Brand unknown . :cool::thumbsup::thumbsup:
     
  9. craytab

    craytab Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 26, 2012
    I like the idea behind the blade tip too, especially for getting at stubborn seeds. That said, $80, 420hc, and wood? Yikes! Either go cheap, replaceable, and durable with low end materials or step the price up and get better materials. This one is expensive with low end materials and the wood handle isn't great for a working bar environment. Gotta love the ad copy too "Bartending mavens across the country are already using this revolutionary knife in the hippest bars and singing its praises."

    As seen in GQ, Esquire, And The New York Times! Lol

    No doubt most of that $80 isn't going into the knife.
     
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  10. David Richardson

    David Richardson

    363
    Nov 30, 2018
    This changes things a little. Are you going to be the only one using this knife, or others? Is the cutting surface knife friendly? Assume you can sharpen/reprofile?

    Given how/where you're going to use it, I think it's going to be more about the geometry than the steel (isn't it always?). While LC200N would do the job, so will AEB-L, VG-10, and many other stainless steels. I think you want a thin knife with a steep edge angle - maybe 11 or 12 DPS. This will cut like crazy and keep an edge longer, provided you have a good surface to cut on.
     
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  11. bigsurbob

    bigsurbob Gold Member Gold Member

    Jun 10, 2016
    That's the idea. Thin, steep angle. And it'd be mine, all mine. Thanks for the steel recommendations.
     
  12. David Richardson

    David Richardson

    363
    Nov 30, 2018
    Another factor is going to be comfort. I was just looking at the Spyderco Z-Cut. Not exactly what you're asking for, but affordable and looks comfortable. BD1N has decent enough edge holding. I've read that it's thin but not as thin behind the edge as it could be. Steep edge angle or some thinning would help with that. I just ordered one to see how it does.

    [​IMG]
     
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  13. bigsurbob

    bigsurbob Gold Member Gold Member

    Jun 10, 2016
    Nice... I was looking at BladeHQ's Spyderco collection after seeing @Danke42 's Counter Puppy in post #26. I like all of those ~$30 kitchen knives for home. I bet they're just fine. Or better. And if, hypothetically speaking, my wife leaves them dirty under the spaghetti pot amongst silverware, no big deal. My bar knife is always clean and in a sheath in my bar bag... in my truck.

    Love to know how that Spyderco Z-cut is and whether that edge needs work.
     
  14. DocJD

    DocJD

    Jan 29, 2016
    :oops: Sorry I missed this , commercial level use . My comments only apply for small scale personal use . ;)
     
  15. bigsurbob

    bigsurbob Gold Member Gold Member

    Jun 10, 2016
    No sweat. This is my first post, and in hindsight... I'd put more info in the OP. Like the info you dug up mid thread. Or what knives I'd used for this exact purpose in the past that fell short. I didn't give yall much to work with. Live and learn I guess!! Thanks for the replies!
     
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  16. afishhunter

    afishhunter Basic Member Basic Member

    Oct 21, 2014
    Any good paring knife.
    My personal choice would be either a 3.5 inch 1095 Old Hickory or Russell Green River, reprofile the edge to 8 ~ 10 DPS, and let it develop a patina. :)

    Cutting/slicing only limes (on a wood cutting board) isn't going to dull it...even when/if you slice the occasional seed.

    As an alternative, you could get an ULU. :)
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2020
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  17. JokersFaceLifter

    JokersFaceLifter

    302
    Jan 6, 2016
    AEB-L as I've read was originally designed to be used as a razor steel, interesting enough, i have such a hard time finding a straight razor actually made from it, maybe they meant razor sharp? --- anyway not trying to hijack the thread, just stay away from tool steels, unless patinas/tarnish/discoloration/rust/pitting or having to constantly clean and oil it doesn't bother you
     
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  18. bigsurbob

    bigsurbob Gold Member Gold Member

    Jun 10, 2016
    Hijack away! Yeah, I think I'd like a nice ss for this knife. Thanks!
     
  19. RoyalHolic

    RoyalHolic Gold Member Gold Member

    630
    Aug 3, 2019
    [​IMG]

    I've had this knife for 4 or 5 years and I've cut thousands of limes and tomatoes with it and it has never let me down.

    Case Tomato slicer 5'1/2 inch.
     
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  20. Bull71

    Bull71

    184
    Jul 18, 2018
    @Roy Batty
    I agree with the recommendation for the Victorinox paring knife. They are inexpensive, stainless, durable, and slice extremely well. They are also very easy to sharpen.
    My wife loves them for use in the kitchen, we have at least a half dozen. An excellent product in my opinion.
     
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