... for cutting only limes

Discussion in 'General Knife Discussion' started by bigsurbob, Sep 21, 2020.

  1. craytab

    craytab Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 26, 2012
    I think we are getting pretty far away from answering the original question. Think ideal steel, not just settling, best you can do.

    I love the Vic paring knives as well. There's always one in our knife drawer. That said, the steel is far from ideal. An $80 420hc knife? Probably will work just fine. Ideal? Not in my mind.

    I'll stick with my answer that LC200n would be the ideal steel for a lime cutting bar tender's knife, IMO of course. Water way would be great!

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  2. bigsurbob

    bigsurbob Gold Member Gold Member

    761
    Jun 10, 2016
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  3. Roy Batty

    Roy Batty Y'all can sling load DEEZ NUTS Platinum Member

    May 25, 2016
    I don’t know what it takes to spend $160 on a knife strictly for cutting limes (waterway) but I’m glad it isn’t something I’d consider.
     
  4. Velitrius

    Velitrius Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 3, 2000
    I use one of these that I got from 1SKS. It's really thin and slicey and makes short work of limes.

    I rinse it off, which I find really effective for reducing lime-related degredation.

    It was insanely inexpensive.
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  5. bigsurbob

    bigsurbob Gold Member Gold Member

    761
    Jun 10, 2016
    Well, the only one at our restaurant that makes more cuts than me is the prep guy in the kitchen. And his cuts aren't as precise. I'm doing tons of uniform garnishes and twists, etc. And I have to look cool doing it since I've got 10 people (who pay my bills) usually watching my every move. I definitely want the best, which is why I brought it up here.

    Of course that scenario was pre-Covid. Now there still limes to cut... but nobody's watching. I guess I'm wishful that it gets back to somewhat normal soon.
     
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  6. David Richardson

    David Richardson Gold Member Gold Member

    337
    Nov 30, 2018
    Makes sense. It's a tool you're going to use all day on the job and it should last years if not indefinitely. A couple of hundred $$ or more for the best tool you can get makes sense to me. Maybe consider a custom fixed blade?

    My wife is a first responder and carries a $300+ folder at work. She tried dozens of of knives and this one was just "it" for her once she had it in her hand. It's not what I would carry, but it works well for her. (Every firefighter, cop, and medic simultaneously give her crap about it and want to know what it costs and where to get one.)

    I get that you want the best tool you can get for your job and that it's not going to be what other people would use.
     
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  7. Mannlicher

    Mannlicher

    Nov 19, 2008
    Sometimes we just over think things. ;)
     
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  8. David Richardson

    David Richardson Gold Member Gold Member

    337
    Nov 30, 2018
    I got a bag of limes for $2 at the grocery store and tried several knives, including the Spydero Z-cut. I tried two small kitchen knives (shaped sort-of like chef's knives, but smaller), two paring knives, a Spyderco Mule (LC200N), a "utility" knife that is essentially a larger paring knife.

    I didn't do a lot of cutting - maybe 2-3 minutes per knife. I did mostly lime slices and wedges with a little cut in the center of the wedge. They all worked fine.

    Best knife: small kitchen knife with some heel (essentially a small chef's knife, often called a "petty). Thin spine, thin behind the edge, good handle, good balance. I could cut with it all day (and have). Probably an inch longer than needed for lime cutting. A slightly shorter one would be better. This one does not have a stainless core. It would work, but not recommended.

    2nd best knife: The larger kitchen knife (180mm). Nice knife that is also thin. Much larger than necessary. It works well, but is just too big.

    3rd: Spyderco Mule. I was surprised by this. It doesn't have kitchen knife shape and has no heel. I didn't expect it to work this well. It cut limes really nicely and is easy to handle. Heavier than needed for lime work. Something lighter is probably better.

    4th: North Arm paring knife. This is S35VN, but of course the limes don't care about the steel. Nice handle and good balance. This would work really well. Heavier than most other paring knives but not too heavy. Quite stainless and will stay sharp a long time.

    5th: The Z-cut. As somewhat odd and interesting knife. They offset handle works really well for cutting because it positions your hand above the board naturally. It did fine on the factory edge. Cut like a razor when I took it to 12 degrees. The issue with this one is that it's all belly. I would be frustrated ensuring all my cuts were complete. A flatter would be better for this purpose, imo. Very light, flexible blade. I got the one with a blunt tip. Should have gotten the pointy one. Not quite what best use is for this one. (Getting the Z-cut to 12 DPS took longer than I expected. I used my 80 grit diamond stone on the EdgePro and was grinding away on it for a while.)

    6th: Henckles utility knife. It was fine. It cuts well enough. Decent handle.

    7th: Victorinox paring knife. It cuts. Not much more too say. Small and very light. I would not be happy using this all day.

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    Left all the stainless ones with blades inserted into lime pieces and more limes on top for ~3 hours. No staining or discoloration with any of them.

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    After this experiment my recommendation would be to find something like the Carter petty knife in a stainless steel with good edge retention. I doubt you'll see much difference between steels corrosion wise. If you can't fine one, it should not be too expensive to get one made in AEB-L, or you could step up and go with M390 for more edge retention or LC200N for more corrosion resistance.
     

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