Fort Williams MK1 versus Pensioner vs Ek Chirra vs Panawal

Discussion in 'Kailash Blades' started by ProudGrognard, Aug 24, 2020.

  1. ProudGrognard

    ProudGrognard

    6
    Aug 24, 2020
    Hi everyone and hi Team Kailash,

    I used to be a member here a loooong time ago, but I thought it would be better to start off new. I have several questions on your various models, and I have already corresponded with Andrew, who has been courtesy itself in replying promptly and thoroughly.

    So first thing first: Kailash Blades has some of the best customer service I have ever seen, in any sector.

    Now my questions:

    I have come to the conclusion that the full tang is not as necessary for sheer toughness in well-made khukris as in other knives. If I am correct, I would like some comments on how different models compare to each other.

    Take for example, the Fort Williams MK-1 vs the Pensioner. Both have as their ideal length 13', but the Pensioner is lighter and its spine is thicker. Does that make it a worse workhorse or less durable? The difference in weight should be front-loaded, so the MK-1 should be a more powerful chopper and perhaps more difficult to handle than the Pensioner. Is that right?
    An Ek Chirra is also 13' and has a spine thickness and weight somewhere in between, but a larger blade. How does that affect its balance? How does a full tang affect its balance?

    And finally, we have the Panawal. The Kailash team states that it is the most durable of its traditional knives. However, a MK-1 has more weight and a spine as thick as a Panawal. I do get that the Panawal has thicker primary and secondary grinds, but would an MK-1 be less of a chopper? Or is it more difficult to wield?

    So help me out, please. I am torn between choices.
     
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  2. ProudGrognard

    ProudGrognard

    6
    Aug 24, 2020
    It seems that my question is doomed not to be answered. Still hanging on to hope, though.
     
  3. Mariusz

    Mariusz

    2
    Aug 17, 2020
    Hi,
    Try to ask here: [email protected]
    Usually it takes 1 - 2 days to get an answer.
    Brgds,
    Mariusz
     
  4. 353

    353

    Feb 20, 2015
    Andrew from @Kailash Blades will reply on all the questions you'll have as soon as he sees your post and have the time to write a proper answer.

    On my order I went with a micarta wrapped stick tang handle. It's still in transit though..
     
  5. Mariusz

    Mariusz

    2
    Aug 17, 2020
    I’m waiting for customs clearnce to get those 2 pcs


    Ps
    I don’t know how to add photos :(
     
    Kailash Blades likes this.
  6. ProudGrognard

    ProudGrognard

    6
    Aug 24, 2020
    Thanks for the answers, everyone. I have contacted Kailash Blades in the past, and I have been impressed with their service. I do hope that the excellent team will see my post and perhaps reply.
     
  7. 353

    353

    Feb 20, 2015
    I do :D

    [​IMG]
     
  8. Kailash Blades

    Kailash Blades KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    381
    Nov 21, 2015
    Hey there guys!
    Thanks so much for holding the stand until I had a chance to see this. @ProudGrognard thanks for your patience on the reply. I've taken on another job alongside my work with Kailash recently and am trying to compress my usual week's worth of on and off work into two days on Monday and Tuesday. If the schedule keeps up and works I might make some automated messages to show when I'll be ale to respond.

    There's a lot of different things that can make a khukuri better or worse as a workhorse, with some workhorses being better suited to certain tasks than others.

    The panawal is the heaviest duty traditional workhorse blade we do which is down to its full tang which helps it withstand very rough, borderline stupid use and its much thicker secondary/ primary bevels. That makes it able to withstand harder hits through bone or antler, go through nails in wood, and endure overswings into rocks etc.

    The MK1 has a more weight forward balance due to the lack of a full tang/buttcap but it has a much leaner grind which makes it a more efficient cutter/chopper. A full tang adds overall blade weight and also moves the point of balance closer to the pommel making for a more controllable but less efficient chopper.

    The Ek chirra does have a broad blade but it also has some serious hollow forging to reduce the blade weight at the very front of blade. As a result the feel is quite light and fast as a result.
    Finally the pensioner does have a thicker spine at the bolster, but it also features a lot of fullering, complex grinding and distal taper. As a result the final weight is a lot lower and the balance is both lively but powerful.

    For many people, a heavier, more powerful blade with a thicker grind doesn't make a good all day working blade though, even though they're often described as workhorses. They're more durable but cut less efficiently. They have more power but can be more fatiguing. Ultimately a good workhorse blade comes down to what kind of work you're looking to do, how you want to do it and in what situations. It's a very personal thing and there's a lot of different competing variables. If you tell me what kind of work you'd want to do and what situations you'd be looking at using the blade in I can make a recommendation for you based off that and my own experience.
    Take care,
    Andrew and the team at Kailash
     
    353 likes this.
  9. ProudGrognard

    ProudGrognard

    6
    Aug 24, 2020
    Thanks for the reply, Andrew. This was excellent. Once again, I am impressed by the time and effort you put into answering.
     
  10. Kailash Blades

    Kailash Blades KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    381
    Nov 21, 2015
    No worries at all.
    Feel free to reach out if you have any questions or concerns
     

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