Hawkologist Consultation Request

Discussion in 'Axe, Tomahawk, & Hatchet Forum' started by CitizenQ, Jun 21, 2007.

  1. CitizenQ

    CitizenQ

    May 5, 2006
    Fellas, I need some advice. I own a K5 hawk and a couple of SRKW Crash Axes. I'm building a TSK (Trunk Survival Kit) for a friend who travels a lotby vehicle. This is a kit that packs into a milk crate (includes sleeping bag, knife, 9 days rations, medical supplies, candle latern, etc.) and I want to include a hammer hawk with the kit. The problem is that I can't spend a lot of money on the hawk. Is there a hawk you guys might recommend for -- say -- under $50.00 that is of resonable quality?

    Thanks in advance.

    Q
     
  2. Grappler1911

    Grappler1911 Banned BANNED

    720
    May 20, 2003
    Home Depot has an awesome contractors hatchet.
    Two sizes.
    The Eswing 3/4ax is nice too.

    For a traditional hawk the Fort Turner get good reviews and are in your price range.
     
  3. CitizenQ

    CitizenQ

    May 5, 2006
    Thanks Grappler, I'll check that Fort Turner out.

    How about the Cold Steel "Trail Hawk." It's inexpensive and looks like a big hunk 'o steel...but is it crap? :confused:

    [​IMG]
     
  4. TemplarKnight21c

    TemplarKnight21c

    516
    Mar 5, 2007
    From what I've heard of Cold Steel's axes/tomahawks/whatever, the heads are good, but tend to come off of the handles, or the handles break.
     
  5. Brody R.

    Brody R.

    360
    Jan 27, 2005
    yea go for the FT
     
  6. Grappler1911

    Grappler1911 Banned BANNED

    720
    May 20, 2003
    The Trail Hawk is really small.
    I had one.
    It's OK for what it is.
    I gave it to my Nephew.

    I like the Cold steel Norse hawk the best.
     
  7. CitizenQ

    CitizenQ

    May 5, 2006
  8. shecky

    shecky

    May 3, 2006
    The handles that come with the Trail Hawks are about as good as any. They'll likely break eventually if you throw them. As will any wooden 'hawk handle. CS does sell replacements inexpensively. The handles only seem to come loose when throwing them, and I simply tap them back on.

    In a pinch the Trail Hawks are quite usable. I find they take a very good edge and are well made. The potential downsides are that they are fairly light. They seem to be the lightest 'hawks CS makes. Using the full length of the handle should help out matters. And the cutting edge is a bit on the small side, a bit more than 2".
     
  9. Return of the J.D.

    Return of the J.D.

    887
    Nov 29, 2005
    The CS Rifleman's Hawk is an alternative. It'll cost you roughly the same as a Trail Hawk. Before deciding one way or the other between a Trail Hawk and a Rifleman's Hawk, try to handle one of each, or at least take a good, hard look at the weight specs for both. The Rifleman's Hawk head is a massive, massive piece of steel: the cutting bit is wider than the Trail Hawk's, the blade is long, and there's even a very significant amount of steel between the eye and the actual hammer part of the head. It's HEAVY. For a "car trunk" application, however, it might be just fine. For most applications, the Trail Hawk might be better--light, and with a little cutting bit, but with a little patience, it'll do most of what needs done. One thing about CS 'hawks: you WILL want to do some work on it before you send it out into the world. At a minimum, you'll want to do some serious sharpening--reprofiling might be more apt--of the edge. Myself, I always also remove the black paint-like finish from the head and the off-white paint-like finish from the handle, and replace them with cold blue and wood-stain-and-linseed-oil, respectively. Also, you'll want some kind of sheath.

    One more thing, while we're here: for any car-based kit, you might want to give at least a little thought to the possibility that the user will want to carry the stuff by hand for at least a little ways. At a minimum, he's likely to be carrying it off road a few tens of yards to a campsite; at a maximum, it'll be nice to have the option of hoofing it out a long ways from wherever his car gets disabled. Therefore, it might not be a bad idea to put something a little more manageable than a milk crate in there to carry stuff. That might be an old day-pack, a duffle bag with shoulder strap from Wal-Mart, or whatever--or even a couple of different bags--but just a thought. For car use, I also keep in mind how things would look from the outside to a potential thief--for this reason, I tend to keep survival stuff in trunks, glove compartments, under seats, etc.--or to disperse individual components throughout the car, just so I don't have a tempting-looking backpack or fanny-pack sitting in plain view.
     
  10. CitizenQ

    CitizenQ

    May 5, 2006
    Great stuff. Thanks guys. :thumbup:
     
  11. BRASMAN

    BRASMAN

    358
    Mar 5, 2007
    If you want a larger Hawk get the CS Rifleman. The Trail Hawk I have is a nice light weight Hawk though for a pack or kit. My Rifleman is certainly a heavier Hawk though that woul probably chop a little better once you put an edge on it. The Trail Hawk did come with a better edge than the Rifleman.
     
  12. messer454

    messer454

    Oct 2, 2006
    I have only had one CS tomahawk I think it was called the frontier and it felt real small to me. I have personal experience with H and B forge and I have been using and throwing their hawks for years and have no complaints. Check here if you want something forged http://www.hbforge.com/products/tomahawks.php
     
  13. hatchetjack

    hatchetjack

    May 24, 2005
    I think you did fine. For what you paid, you'll get a decent lightweight tool. I get my Trail Hawks from Elite also.

    I cut the handle down to about 15". A couple layers of cloth tape also improves the grip or a cord wrap. I made this one with a beater handle that I used for throwing. This Trail Hawk is part of my car kit.

    [​IMG]
     
  14. CitizenQ

    CitizenQ

    May 5, 2006
    That's a mighty fine lookin' trail hawk HJ. I' gonna wrap mine with paracord like that. One of my Crash Axes cost $175, the other $200, and my K5 cost $150. I can't wait for my $19.75 Trail Hawk. I just might sell of of the SRKW hawks. Really lookin' forward to beatin' on the trail hawk. :)
     
  15. BRASMAN

    BRASMAN

    358
    Mar 5, 2007
    Very nice hawk! You have inspired me.
     
  16. ras

    ras

    Jan 9, 2002
    I recently got one too. Very underrated piece of gear.
     
  17. messer454

    messer454

    Oct 2, 2006
    Hey Brasman-Is that some kind of set screw you have in teh side of that hawk? If so how did you install it and why? Thanks
     
  18. Bigfattyt

    Bigfattyt

    Jun 23, 2007
    The Cold steel trail hawks come with a set screw on them. just take them out before you do much throwing with them. If you get lazy and don't, you will split your handle if it hits handle first.
     
  19. hatchetjack

    hatchetjack

    May 24, 2005
    Here's my other Trail Hawk with a more traditional look and a Frontier Hawk I re-did:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  20. Dr. Mudd

    Dr. Mudd

    Nov 7, 2006
    To me, the basic concept and execution of a tomahawk is fairly simple, and it matters little to me if it was drop forged in Taiwan for Cold Steel or hand forged in Middle America by a real craftsman. I don't say that to offend anyone who makes or prizes fine, handmade 'hawks, but to me it's a utilitarian tool first and foremost, unless the user is really into recreating an historical period and lifestyle.
     

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