How important is symmetry on a Scandi grind?

Discussion in 'General Knife Discussion' started by Shocktroop0351, Feb 13, 2020.

  1. Shocktroop0351

    Shocktroop0351

    4
    Feb 13, 2020
    Hello everyone, FNG here with most likely an FNG question. I recently purchased a new knife advertised as having a Scandi grind and the primary bevel is not the same on both sides. The blade is 3/16” thick 1095 and the primary bevel is about 1/8” higher on one side. This is a hard use survival knife so I’m not as concerned about aesthetics, I’m mainly concerned with those angles affecting the ability to sharpen it down the road. The edge is very close to being centered in the blade, but I wouldn’t be surprised if it’s off a small amount either. So long story short, my questions are 1) Will the primary bevel grind being off affect the knife performance in it’s intended role? 2) In today’s knife market, is it acceptable to sell a knife for around $150 with a grind like this?

    Thank you all in advance for your advice and help!
     
  2. Danke42

    Danke42

    Feb 10, 2015
    Hard to say. Post some pictures showing the knife and the issue.
     
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  3. FortyTwoBlades

    FortyTwoBlades Baryonyx walkeri Dealer / Materials Provider

    Mar 8, 2008
    Functionally not important, but I wouldn't consider it acceptable on a knife that expensive. If it's a scandi grind then the only bevel is the primary bevel, so calling it the primary bevel implies the existence of a secondary bevel, which would make it a conventional saber grind instead, so if it's truly a scandi then just calling it "the bevel" or "the grind" would be more terminologically clear. If the grind angle is the same on both sides then you can just sharpen the "short" side until the blade evens out, though.
     
  4. Smiling

    Smiling

    508
    Nov 21, 2019
    Well, asymmetrical grind isn't a big deal if it's secondary bevel on sabre or hollow or full flat grind... but if it's primary bevel - there is a problem.
    Scandi grind just isn't my cup of tea tho, and I imagine it's also not easy to sharpen.
     
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  5. Bigfattyt

    Bigfattyt Gold Member Gold Member

    Jun 23, 2007

    They are not too difficult to sharpen........ unless you damage the edge with a big chip or dent....then it is more time consuming to grind past the damage than a ffg, or convex, etc.

    The scandi grind is handy if you have a hard time "feeling" the correct angle on a narrow edge. ..with the scandi, if it is flat, you can lay that wide bevel on the stone and really feel the proper angle!
     
  6. marcinek

    marcinek Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 9, 2007
    Precisely. They are incredibly easy to sharpen.
     
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  7. Shocktroop0351

    Shocktroop0351

    4
    Feb 13, 2020
    Thanks for the input everyone. As much as pictures would help I don’t want to put them out until the maker has had the opportunity to rectify the situation. This knife does in fact have a secondary bevel, and if I’m understanding you guys correctly that means the primary bevel is not as important functionally.
     
  8. FortyTwoBlades

    FortyTwoBlades Baryonyx walkeri Dealer / Materials Provider

    Mar 8, 2008
    And slow. :D
     
  9. abcdef

    abcdef

    Oct 28, 2005
    The symmetry seems way off for $150. Could trade it in for a lifetime supply of Marttiinis, Hultafors and Moraknivs.
     
  10. Bigfattyt

    Bigfattyt Gold Member Gold Member

    Jun 23, 2007
    3/16 inch thick 1095 and the scandi bevel has a secondary bevel? Hard use?

    Are you describing a saber ground blade? With the actual edge being an additional bevel on the scandi grind?
     
  11. Korean Hog

    Korean Hog Gold Member Gold Member

    839
    Mar 12, 2017
    If a knife is noticeably wonky or uneven I get pretty pissed if it's $100 or more, but I'd be at least irritated from around $50 and up with a knife that had serious symmetry issues.
     
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  12. allenC

    allenC

    Jun 18, 2000
    It's not acceptable for me.
    I would send it back.
     
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  13. Shocktroop0351

    Shocktroop0351

    4
    Feb 13, 2020
    From what I understand it’s a micro bevel on a Scandi grind. This secondary bevel is no more than 1/16” wide. I think if a person wanted to take it to a true Scandi it wouldn’t take much to work out the micro bevel.
     
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  14. FortyTwoBlades

    FortyTwoBlades Baryonyx walkeri Dealer / Materials Provider

    Mar 8, 2008
    A true microbevel is only visible with deliberate scrutiny under bright light. If the secondary bevel is clearly visible to the naked eye without having to hunt for it you've got a full-blown macrobevel, and therefore a conventional saber grind.
     
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  15. Shocktroop0351

    Shocktroop0351

    4
    Feb 13, 2020
    Oh ok, thanks for the insight. I would say that’s what it is then. In your opinion, does the primary bevels being off on a saber grind affect the performance of the knife then?
     
  16. FortyTwoBlades

    FortyTwoBlades Baryonyx walkeri Dealer / Materials Provider

    Mar 8, 2008
    Depends how it's off. If the angles are equal, just ground more on one side, it's not going to really impact anything. If the angles are different but not by a huge degree, it's also not a massive problem. But if the grind is seriously "twisted" relative to the plane of the blade stock then it can cause tracking issues. The effect is probably not going to be great enough for it to make a meaningful functional difference, but nevertheless I'd consider it unacceptable on a knife at its price point.
     
  17. Bigfattyt

    Bigfattyt Gold Member Gold Member

    Jun 23, 2007

    Not really... it might annoy me.

    I've had customs (albeit budget customs) with absolutely awful grinds ( I mean blind and maybe slightly insane crack head grinds). Warps, Wonks, and bad grinding!!
     

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