Is this specific knife decent? On sale? Coolina...

Discussion in 'Kitchen Cutlery & Tools' started by Bo NJ, Oct 18, 2020.

  1. Bo NJ

    Bo NJ

    9
    Sep 13, 2020
    Hello all, I thought I'd ask the resident experts...I am a newbie, been reading, learning, and still know nothing about knives, cutlery, etc.

    So, I was looking around and found Coolina...and yes, I searched here and read they are normally -- typical, overpriced, machine made, etc. However, I see they are running a sale...and...for $50??? Is this still not a good deal? Thanks in advance everyone.

    https://coolinastore.com/collection...sho™-professional-japanese-chefs-knife-8-inch
     
  2. Ourorboros

    Ourorboros

    568
    Jan 23, 2017
    Well I don't know if I want something as large grained as 440C for my kitchen cutlery, BUT for $50 I don't think you'd be ripped off much either. Pickings get pretty slim at the lower price points.
    With a full tang it's going to be heavier than a Japanese design.
    I don't care for the "ruthlessly sharp" silliness.
    Look, it's $50 and if you want it, try it out. Worst case it's $20 more than the true value.

    *If you process a bunch of meat, a lot of people do prefer toothier edges, so 440C isn't necessarily an impediment to performance.
     
    Bo NJ likes this.
  3. Eli Chaps

    Eli Chaps Gold Member Gold Member Basic Member

    Apr 20, 2018
    What's going on with that weird bolster-like back end? Is that just the light?

    For $50 I'd just get a Fibrox and call it good.
     
  4. Bo NJ

    Bo NJ

    9
    Sep 13, 2020
    Thanks...I greatly appreciate it.
     
  5. Bo NJ

    Bo NJ

    9
    Sep 13, 2020
    Thank you very much...it's funny, I've been reading, trying to learn, etc., and have found a lot of the finer points (no pun intended) and nuances very difficult to really learn and absorb. From reading a few other threads, and from speaking with a friend of mine, it seems like the "default" or "go to" option for someone inexperienced, for a basic, all around, etc., type use...is Fibrox (at least for a general "chef" knife).

    So, rather than get frustrated, possibly have that paralysis by analysis thing -- I think that's the best move for me, so thank you!

    That said, Fibrox Pro 8'' Chef’s Knife (which is labeled as "Extra Wide") or the Fibrox Pro Santoku Knife (which is 7 inches)? Both about $50.

    There's a Pro Carving knife and a Pro Kitchen knife, 7 and 6 inches respective, but those are $30 and $36. Not sure they are "as good" for general use.

    Thanks again!!! I greatly appreciate the insight and expertise!
     
  6. Eli Chaps

    Eli Chaps Gold Member Gold Member Basic Member

    Apr 20, 2018
    Chef's knife vs. Santoku is going to be personal preference.

    My experience is, you'll likely try out many things over the years as you test and refine your likes.
     
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  7. fishface5

    fishface5 Gold Member Gold Member

    Feb 3, 2001
    I got and rehandled a fibrox pro kitchen for a friend who cooks a lot and it's his favorite knife
     
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  8. Bo NJ

    Bo NJ

    9
    Sep 13, 2020
    Thank you very much. That makes perfect sense...and they are inexpensive enough that I might as well get both. I love to cook, do it often, but have zero knowledge of knives and cutlery. I am learning, but it doesn't look good for me to even get a basic understanding, LOL. I don't know if it's the bandwidth, or just the "old dog, new tricks" mentality or what, LOL. I think I like to "keep it simple" and that's that. LOL.

    Thank you. I appreciate the insight.
     
  9. GABaus

    GABaus

    203
    May 7, 2017
    depending on what steel they use they look a bit overly similar to the forged in fire branded knives(have used forged in fire branded knives and do not recommend the geometry sucks and the balance is terrible) do you have a source that indicates the stock thickness and thickness behind the edge, at that price if it has decent geometry and a decent heat treat you are getting a decent deal. As for fibrox, when it comes to design and ergonomics they are great knives, I personally wish the blades were stamped from a thinner stock and ground thinner behind the edge but they are thin enough to do well and are very functional.
     
  10. Ourorboros

    Ourorboros

    568
    Jan 23, 2017
    Chef's knives are more versatile than santokus, but you might not use the versatility.
    Santoku's are easier to have an awareness of, being shorter and straighter (that is, awareness of where the blade is). If a beginner is afraid of cutting themselves, it's a good thing.

    The tip of a chef's knife can be useful, instead of grabbing a paring knife. The weight of a western chef's knife let's you do light butchery, though if you completely take apart a chicken some shears would be better for cutting out the spine. It's long enough to be a slicer for chicken and turkey breasts, but thin slices or a small ham would be too much. If you want to learn to rock chop, this is the knife to start with.
    A santoku is generally flatter, which great for push cuttering/chopping. Tip work is clumsy at best, but a useful paring knife is cheap. You can still cut chicken breasts for serving. The variations with belly can be used for rock chopping - but why?

    A carving knife is a specialty thing. A true carving knife is used for cuts of meat with bone (cooked, of course). It wouldn't be ideal to do meal prep.

    I still see Victorinox Chef's knives for $35, so I don't know where you are shopping.
     

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