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Kizer M390 Limited Editions Introductions

Discussion in 'Kizer Cutlery' started by Kizer Cutlery, Nov 14, 2017.

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  1. Kizer Cutlery

    Kizer Cutlery Moderator Moderator

    273
    Jun 24, 2013
    People who know Kizer clear that the most frequently-used steels of Kizer knives are S35VN and VG10. In order to make a great design even better, we upgrade some of the designs using M390 steel. “Newer steel, easier carry, faster opening” are the aims of Kizer M390 Limited Editions. We took some of our popular models and created new incarnations in M390 steel, sized down for easier carry in daily use, but retained the features that made each a crowd pleaser. Each knife is individually serialized and only produced in limited quantity.

    The first model is the Flashbang M3909(ki3454) designed by Matt Cucchiara, the size-down version of Flashbang(Ki454)

    Ki3454A1

    [​IMG]

    Ki3454A2

    [​IMG]

    Specs

    Steel: M390

    Handle: 6AL4V Titanium

    Blade Length: 3.07’’/77.98mm

    Overall: 7.28’’/184.91mm

    Weight: 3.22oz/91.29g​


    The second one is the Dorado M390(Ki3455) also designed by Matt Cucchiara, size-down version of Dorado(Ki455)

    Ki3455A1

    [​IMG]

    Ki3455A2

    [​IMG]

    Specs

    Steel:M390

    Handle: 6AL4V Titanium

    Blade Length: 2.99’’/75.95mm

    Overall: 7.13’’/181.10mm

    Weight: 3.54oz/100.36g​


    The third one is Intrepid M390 designed by Ray Laconico, variation of Intrepid (Ki4468)

    Ki3468

    [​IMG]

    Specs

    Steel:M390

    Handle: 6AL4V Titanium

    Blade Length: 2.99’’/75.95mm

    Overall: 6.74’’/171.20mm

    Weight: 3.01oz/85.33g​


    The last one is Shoal M390 designed by Kim Ning, variation of Kizer home-design Shoal(Ki4469)

    Ki3469A1

    [​IMG]

    Ki3469A2

    [​IMG]

    Specs

    Steel:M390

    Handle: 6AL4V Titanium

    Blade Length: 2.99’’/75.95mm

    Overall: 6.73’’/170.94mm

    Weight: 3.06oz/86.75g
    Which other models do you expect us to upgrade and how?

    [​IMG]: https://www.instagram.com/kizercutlery_inc/
     
    bikerector and mrknife like this.
  2. dkb45

    dkb45 Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 16, 2012
    An upgraded Splinter would be amazing. That's one model I really want, but have been holding back because I'm not the biggest fan of S35VN.
     
  3. Lapedog

    Lapedog Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 7, 2016
    Yo what are you guys doing. This would have been the perfect opportunity to release a version of the Feist that isn't tainted with quality control issues. (I still can't believe Kizer made no way to distinguish the fixed Feists from the faulty Feists)

    How much smaller are these versions? 75%?
     
    t.willy and mrknife like this.
  4. RamZar

    RamZar Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 3, 2013
    These have been around for a year now!

    I have the Mini Intrepid. Great little knife but overpriced.
     
    flash900 likes this.
  5. sn0wman72

    sn0wman72 Gold Member Gold Member

    116
    Oct 13, 2017
    Would like to see a Gemni or Guru with upgraded steel (v110) and stone washed, and some coolness added to the scale (at least a smooth finish)

    Even more how about abandoning the star-ish look to the pivot screw and using a smooth one instead?
     
  6. mrknife

    mrknife Gold Member Gold Member

    May 9, 2010
    I would like to see a new Feist with more blade. can ground down the spacer a bit to accommodate a spear or perhaps something more wharncliff like a arcform bladeshape.
     
  7. RamZar

    RamZar Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 3, 2013
    NG VI likes this.
  8. sechip

    sechip Gold Member Gold Member

    Feb 27, 2013
    A T1 with a satin M390 blade would be great as the knife is awesome in it's own right.
     
    Justin Partridge and NG VI like this.
  9. wayoftread

    wayoftread

    32
    Aug 22, 2014
    Great idea. 2.75-3.25 blade length is my perfect Edc !
     
  10. Alex Ford

    Alex Ford Gold Member Gold Member

    15
    Nov 30, 2018
    I looked at knife reviews and offerings for the past 6 months and my impulse-control was not at all good. Each knife I looked at had a personality and character of its own. Some of these are going back; not for repair but permanently.
    If you read any of my reviews you will get my honest Newby opinion.
    The Kizer Dorado 5A2 version, has an overall fit and finish, that makes it one of the best knives I own. I did not initially realize that my Dorado was a part of a serialized run. This one is #183/200. By now this knife is probably sold out. Also, I don't know anything about the Kizer numbering system. This Dorado has subtle changes to it from earlier versions documented in this forum. For example, the Ki345 5A2. Also note the 5A1 and the 4A2. Looking at the latter, I saw a difference in handle shape with basic engraving pretty much the same. Slight color variations inside of the engraving perhaps lend authenticity to a new run.
    Now about this folder. There is no thumb stud to mar the beauty of the polished, engraved handle. The show-side scale is beautiful on this version. Deleting some blue in part of the engraving channel, creates a "less is more," look. The stone washed finish has its own look and at some viewing angles produces a partial rainbow appearance.
    Blade-shape is gorgeous with the ricasso appearing to be a planned part of the design. The curve at the top of the blade is beautiful. The spine is machined ever so slightly to remove possible hot spots/edges on top. The drop to the point is gradual measuring about 11/64th's of an inch.
    The 'look' of the pivot blends in well on the scales and seems to add a sort of motion in the design. While the engraving design is repeated from earlier runs of the Dorado these knives fall into the category that is neither regular production nor custom. That said, blade in my example is perfectly centered within the handle, open or closed. The lock up of the frame lock bar is rock solid and is of a reinforced design for longer useful life. Metal to metal contact appears to be at the 50% range. (To make this estimate, I looked at the engagement points under a 5X magnifier.
    The frame appears elegant with a single stand-off held in place by recessed Torx screws. This insides of the Ti scales are polished, further adding to the jewel-like aspect of this collectible/capable EDC. The interior of the scale scallops have chamfers and the edges are polished. Details!
    The size and spacing of the information-engraving on the blade is pleasing to the eye. Lettering and logo appear to be perfectly fitted on the ricasso in the 40%-to-center range. The M390 Steel information and model/run numbers add to the knife design.
    Capital & small letters are used to name the knife "Dorado," on the blade. The serial number on the blade flat includes both the specific number & the total run number. How cool is that? This with other subtle changes differentiate this knife from other runs along with aforementioned design differences.
    The top of the blade has the extremely classy "Cucchiara" (designer) name engraved in the center top of the blade's thickest part. This is reminiscent of artist designed side engraving as done on some military medals and coinage on the side. This is again, a detail that took time, energy, planning and labor to execute.
    Because there is machining of curves into the scales, they appear to be subdued and thinner than they otherwise might look without this design detail.
    The choil is just sufficient for choking up on the blade, but may be seen as a sharpening choil.
    The flipper tab has 2 jimps in it, just enough to adequately effectuate deployment. This is perfect for flipping and the tab is machined just right so that no soreness develops with extended flipping practice.
    Another "custom" aspect of the Dorado is the machining of the right-handed thumb space for better access to reach the lock-bar. Unlocking some framelocks is a chore without this relief. This detail is not so obviously noticeable, yet is just sufficient to make unlocking more of a pleasure than a chore. The blade has a currently popular element, the curve on the sharpened edge, providing a flowing line and the possibility for slicing and dicing a variety of herbs, salad ingredients, meats and the like. The grind to the edge is gradual. Not terribly thin, the blade is meant to be strong. The blade comes from the factory quite sharp, in part due to the sharpening angle, which I did not measure. Finishing the blade description, the swedge runs along about 50% of the length of the blade and is artistically rendered. The sum of the blade work yields for the user enough "spear" to pierce, if required.
    The Dorado has no lanyard hole, but the stand-off on the handle allows the owner to put a lanyard on the end if desired. Building the lanyard onto the knife would work as well as disassembling the knife to get a pre-made lanyard around the stand-off, and between the scales.
    Keeping this knife in pocket (if it doesn't somehow become a collection queen) is the clip which is anodized in a gradient of purple color on the clip's visible side.
    It is held in by two Torx screws. Both are recessed. The clip has a similar design to that of some Reate produced clips for their Ti knives except that the outer top of the clip is machined with a chamfer-at-an-angle with the screw-hole with the top Torx screw position dropped being countersunk or machined, so that the screw head is mostly recessed. That detail is extreme but it is characteristic of the design and execution of this knife throughout the build.
    The overall effect of the polish upon the look of the knife is stunning. Yes, I spent some coin on this knife but this knife is well worth it. The Dorado is as good of an execution on a short run knife that I have seen. For now this one stays in my collection. I can't see it going anywhere else for any reason that I can now see.
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2019
  11. Hackenslash

    Hackenslash Platinum Member Platinum Member

    Jul 25, 2014
    You've obviously put a lot of thought into your write up. You might consider a proof reader and some paragraphs. I tried a few times to follow your discourse and gave up each time.
     
    Bmgillum likes this.
  12. Mo2

    Mo2

    Apr 8, 2016
    https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1OepNr_D4lqbdTFqdqWl1rmAd4bOzPzJe6J0iEWrdJGU/htmlview

    Anyone at Kizer know why they heat treated the m390 at 58hrc vs the norm of 60-62?
    With a sample size of 1 this may just be the only one this way... Until more get tested to show a larger picture. But why use m390 if it's not in the optimal range? Might as well stick with the s35vn. 58hrc imho is way to low unless it's gone through a deep freeze cryo process for 12-24 hours like Buck Knives does with the BOS heat treatment. To me this is just putting a steel that's popular on a knife to sell it based off of paper specs.
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2019
    Akcir likes this.
  13. Alex Ford

    Alex Ford Gold Member Gold Member

    15
    Nov 30, 2018
    It is now 2/13/2019, and I read your analysis of my submission and you were and are absolutely right. I made some editing changes. I don't know if the review is any better, but now I hope you and others can at least read it. The first review happens when I'm too much in a hurry or too tired. Thank you for the constructive criticism. Hopefully I will A) Improve; B) Shorten things up.
     
  14. Hackenslash

    Hackenslash Platinum Member Platinum Member

    Jul 25, 2014
    I'm glad you took it as constructive. The last thing I'd like to do is discourage a fellow Knife Knut from sharing their experiences and observations. Keep posting your reviews!
     
  15. Akcir

    Akcir

    410
    Sep 16, 2012
    Like Mo said, what's the point of having soft M390?
    I think I'll pass. I already have a Kizer that I like everything about, except the S35VN is on the soft side.
     
  16. Mesenzo

    Mesenzo

    174
    Nov 5, 2015
    I put my money on the "just too small number tested" and this being an exception. I have not tested those Limited Edition Mini's with M390 but recently did test two pieces of the Mjolnir with M390 and those had 60.9 and 60.8 HRC.
    Their S35VN knives (tested many over the years) always were in the 58.5 to 60 HRC ball park.
    Btw; hardness is not the only criteria important to a knife steel! Toughness and wear resistance are just as important.
     
    colin.p likes this.
  17. Akcir

    Akcir

    410
    Sep 16, 2012
    Edge retention can be somewhat of a factor when purchasing a folder with higher end steel.
     
    Mo2 likes this.
  18. Mo2

    Mo2

    Apr 8, 2016
    [​IMG]
    hmm, 53hrc s35vn, 58hrc s35vn and 58hrc m390.
    hopfully more get tested, that 53 is not idea, but i suspect that will happen for any brand once in a while. thats only 2 in s35vn. dunno when more will get added.
     
  19. Mo2

    Mo2

    Apr 8, 2016
    and another low one in s35vn at 55hrc. Skip to 9:13 in the video.

     
  20. Comeuppance

    Comeuppance Fixed Blade EDC Emisssary Gold Member

    Jan 12, 2013
    From that same chart, I skipped down the the disorganized recent additions and found their Acuto 440C tested at 54, far from the advertised 58-60.

    Troubling.
     

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