Laminated, Damascus, one-material blades — advantages and disadvantages?

Discussion in 'General Knife Discussion' started by Naphtali, Feb 11, 2020.

  1. Mikael W

    Mikael W Gold Member Gold Member

    Apr 21, 2007
    It works like Ebay so it's up to the seller.

    Regards
    Mikael
     
  2. Mikael W

    Mikael W Gold Member Gold Member

    Apr 21, 2007
    I own and use a lot of FK models. None of the larger ones have chipped during chopping. None have had any tips broken.
    What can happen is Micro-chipping on a new knife with the factoryedge still in place. Resharpen a few times and the edge get stable.
    I put my own edge to any new knife regardless of brand because IMO factory edges sucks.

    Regards
    Mikael
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2020
  3. marcinek

    marcinek Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 9, 2007
    You are missing the core concept of laminated steel. It has a hard core which holds an edge well, but may be "brittle". The core is sandwiched by layers that are not prone to breaking.

    That's the whole point.
     
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  4. Rich S

    Rich S

    Sep 23, 2005
    Mikael

    Checked out Tradera. Their English version is still in trial stage and my Swedish is non-existent :-(
    The pics did show some nice knives, prices ?, maybe a bit high with US shipping. Will check back on them
    from time to time. Thanks.

    BTW, my wife collects Swedish barrel knives; nice collection.
    Rich
     
  5. FortyTwoBlades

    FortyTwoBlades Baryonyx walkeri Dealer / Materials Provider

    Mar 8, 2008
    Especially since not only does the softer cladding support that delicate core, but making that core thinner makes it tougher, as well.
     
  6. marcinek

    marcinek Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 9, 2007
    Exactly. Smiling's claim is like saying the disadvantage of hamburgers is that they are hot and juicy. Bun, dude.
     
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  7. Velitrius

    Velitrius Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 3, 2000
    Yeah. The oft-neglected bun... some folk just can't appreciate it for what it is/does.
     
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  8. Mecha

    Mecha Titanium Bladesmith Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Dec 27, 2013
    I've even heard that an anaconda don't want none unless it got buns (hun).
     
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  9. Mikael W

    Mikael W Gold Member Gold Member

    Apr 21, 2007
    Yes the shipping is an obstacle, when buying from overseas.
    Barrelknives are cool, but I have yet to see one in real life as they are not common anymore.

    Regards
    Mikael
     
  10. Velitrius

    Velitrius Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 3, 2000
    Dude, side note... The TOPS Anaconda design would be killer with a laminated constriction... I mean Construction.
     
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  11. Rich S

    Rich S

    Sep 23, 2005
    Mikael

    I don't yet have a pic of her collection. About 40 I would guess including some rare ones ranging from 1 inch barrel to a 9 inch one. She has most Swedish (Eskiltuna), but also Norwegian, Mora Sweden (rare), England, Indian copies, and what I think is a Chinese one (at least it has Chinese characters on the tang.
    I'll try to get a pic of her collection.
    Rich

    Edit:Got a pic of her collection (none laminated or damascus).

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2020
    Mikael W likes this.
  12. Smiling

    Smiling

    509
    Nov 21, 2019
    My statement was that the edge could and often is chippy when it comes to laminated blades, not that entire knife is fragile. Soft steel does help when it comes to shock from impact, but the part of the edge itself will still get a chip if that steel is fragile.
     
  13. marcinek

    marcinek Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 9, 2007
    Fallknivens have been known to chip on first use (a quick stropping prevents it).

    So who else's laminated steel chips?
     
  14. FortyTwoBlades

    FortyTwoBlades Baryonyx walkeri Dealer / Materials Provider

    Mar 8, 2008
    It may still be fragile (or may not be, depending on steel and heat treatment) but reducing the thickness of the core steel does make it more able to bend or flex without cracking, chipping, or snapping. :)
     
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  15. Mikael W

    Mikael W Gold Member Gold Member

    Apr 21, 2007
    Rich, that has to be the single most impressive collection of Barrelknives I've seen to date!
    Another name for this type (in Swedish) is "Konst täljkniv" or "Art whittlingknife".

    Regards
    Mikael
     
  16. Mikael W

    Mikael W Gold Member Gold Member

    Apr 21, 2007
    John, I would say some of them have Microchipped. Taking the edge to a DC or CC stone at 4-5 times + honing on leather is what I have done.
    Chipping to me are those nasty halfmoon chips out of the edge and that requires reprofiling on a beltsander. Semantics I know, but I like to be clear.:cool:

    Regards
    Mikael
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2020
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  17. Mikael W

    Mikael W Gold Member Gold Member

    Apr 21, 2007
    Hm, if I read this right You mean that the core steel often gets brittle if laminated?
    Lets look at the F1 in lam. VG-10 and the F1 in solid VG-10.
    Same steel, same heat-treatment and same geometry.
    Does the fact that the solid VG-10 F1 isn't laminated, make the entire knife fragile? :D

    Regards
    Mikael
     
  18. Mikael W

    Mikael W Gold Member Gold Member

    Apr 21, 2007
    42,
    Very few has explained it in a more eloquent way than You do. :thumbsup:

    Regards
    Mikael
     
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  19. FortyTwoBlades

    FortyTwoBlades Baryonyx walkeri Dealer / Materials Provider

    Mar 8, 2008
    I run into it VERY often with vintage American scythe blades. Many were made using very thin, laminated construction, and a common indicator that a blade is a laminated one is when you find it bent and twisted like a noodle. :p They can almost always be bent back cold without experiencing cracking, and yet tend to have edges that are harder than their whole-steel counterparts. Whole steel blades tend to be more resistant to taking a set, but also softer in the edge (though still quite hard) and it's much more common to encounter a cracked whole steel blade than it is to find a laminated one that has met the same fate.
     
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  20. Mikael W

    Mikael W Gold Member Gold Member

    Apr 21, 2007
    Yes and it's the same with lam. Mora's. They are easy to bend but just as easy to bend back to true.
    The core of O1 steel is hardened to around hrc 61, but the outer skins are soft due to the very low carbon content.

    Regards
    Mikael
     
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