Recommendation? Least expensive razor sharp guided edgemaker

Discussion in 'Maintenance, Tinkering & Embellishment' started by desert_dweller5, May 2, 2020.

  1. desert_dweller5

    desert_dweller5

    4
    May 2, 2020
    So I need to sharpen my kitchen knives and I'm a noob. I tried using a whetstone but I cut myself quite deeply, so I'm not going back to that. other than whetstones what is the least expensive but most effective way to sharpen kitchen knives? I saw Lansky deluxe diamond set performed as well as a wicked edge in
    but there are cheaper Lansky systems. Can I get the same edge with non-diamond stones? Also, my knives have chips in the cutting edge. I assume I'll have to sand those out before I can use my knives again. What is the minimum investment I need to get a 100-gram edge? I want to be able to peel a grape and make translucent slices of tomato. Champagne tastes on a water budget. thanks.
     
  2. desert_dweller5

    desert_dweller5

    4
    May 2, 2020
    So I need to sharpen my kitchen knives and I'm a noob. I tried using a whetstone but I cut myself quite deeply, so I'm not going back to that. other than whetstones what is the least expensive but most effective way to sharpen kitchen knives? I saw Lansky deluxe diamond set performed as well as a wicked edge in
    but there are cheaper Lansky systems. Can I get the same edge with non-diamond stones? Also, my knives have chips in the cutting edge. I assume I'll have to sand those out before I can use my knives again. What is the minimum investment I need to get a 100-gram edge? I want to be able to peel a grape and make translucent slices of tomato. Champagne tastes on a water budget. thanks.
     
  3. bflying

    bflying Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 4, 2014
    I haven't used the guided Lansky's. So the cheapest (and most expensive) guided systems I have are the KME (w/ diamonds), and EdgePro Apex. Both have their own pro's-n-con's. I pretty much use the same process for kitchen knives as I do with EDC's and other utility's.

    Usually set the edge on my KME (or EP for large or unusually shapped blades). With use, I'll strop to maintain a "great" edge. Then when needed, will use a SharpMaker to touch-up and maintain a "good" edge. When the edge can no longer be brought back with a very quick few passes on the SharpMaker, then it's time to start the process over.
     
  4. Ourorboros

    Ourorboros

    418
    Jan 23, 2017
    With kitchen knife steels, you don't need to use diamond stones to get the keenest edges. Good for high vanadium steels, which isn't normally a thing in kitchen cutlery.
    No idea on the rest.
     
  5. Papilio

    Papilio

    43
    Sep 6, 2019
    I don't know those guided systems first hand. A couple of years ago I could watch a demonstration on such a system and the knife was sharp. I think it was this one https://lansky.com/products/4-rod-turn-box/
    I don't think that non-diamond stones are less effective. Diamond stones are useful when you want to remove material (that means coarser grits) because the edge is very dull or even chipped. There are some diamonds that will get your blade super sharp but they are expensive.
    For fine honing ceramic (rods) will probably leave a finer edge. And you want your blade razor sharp .
     
  6. Ben Dover

    Ben Dover Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 2, 2006
    I think the Edge-Pro Apex is your best bet.
    You can start with the basic set up, and upgrade as much, or as little, as you desire.

    Even the basic set up will allow you go get straight razor sharp blades.
     
  7. desert_dweller5

    desert_dweller5

    4
    May 2, 2020
    thanks for all your replies. unfortunately, I think all of those systems are out of my price range. I'm basically having to borrow money to do this because I need to have a sharp knife to be able to cook meals for myself. seems like I'm going to have to just buy a shitty $20 chef knife and limp along with that until I can afford a good sharpener. :(
     
  8. AntDog

    AntDog Gold Member Gold Member Basic Member

    Apr 3, 2001
    If you need to go super cheap, just strop it on a piece of fine sandpaper.
     
  9. desert_dweller5

    desert_dweller5

    4
    May 2, 2020
    with chips in the blade?
     
  10. Diemaker

    Diemaker KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    581
    Apr 28, 2017
    Then start with emery cloth before switching to sandpaper.

    I think the best cheapest way to sharpen knives is a good combination stone. Yes, you cut yourself, now you know what to avoid, I bet we have all done that. Just get a decent stone and learn how to use it. I don't freehand but I can do it when I need to.

    Oh, and just because you use a guided sharpener don't think your safe from cutting yourself.
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2020
    Tjstampa likes this.
  11. Craig James

    Craig James

    117
    Oct 30, 2018
    The Wicked Edge has always looked a lot more dangerous to me than a bench stone!
     
    willc and Mr.Wizard like this.
  12. Natlek

    Natlek

    Jun 9, 2015
    Make one !Important is only angle , you can make this from wood ...
    [​IMG]
     
    willc likes this.
  13. AntDog

    AntDog Gold Member Gold Member Basic Member

    Apr 3, 2001
    Use rougher sandpaper. :/

    There are ways to get around all of this stuff on the cheap.
     
  14. Old Biker

    Old Biker

    662
    Sep 25, 2016
    If you want an inexpensive guided sharpener, go to the big river site and search for AGPTEK sharpener. The stone that come with it will work, if that's all you have. I recommend discarding them and getting something better. Any stone made to fit the Edge Pro will work, and there are a lot of them out there. I recommend the 3 plate diamond stone set for edge pro buy CKTG.

    O.B.
     
  15. stitchawl

    stitchawl

    Jul 26, 2008
    Jeez! If you want cheap and very good, pick up a DMT aligner jig for $12.95, and use it with a few sheets of wet/dry sandpaper. No stones to buy, a range of angles to choose from, and almost idiot-proof to use.
    I've been using this setup for camping for years. All you need is a flat counter top to work on, 2-3 sheets of sandpaper, and the Aligner jig. Couldn't be simpler, and you can take edges down to 2000 grit if you want. That's a bit overkill for a kitchen knife, but for thems that want 'em...


    Stitchawl
     

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