Lionsteel M9

Discussion in 'LionSteel knives' started by Revolverrodger, Dec 31, 2017.

  1. Revolverrodger

    Revolverrodger KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jul 23, 2007
    I love the lionsteel M7 as a general use knife but would love to see a larger version of that knife with a 9 or 9.5 inch blade

    When is moletta going to make the M9 ?
     
    knoefz likes this.
  2. JackTheLad21

    JackTheLad21

    52
    Sep 17, 2017
    I think he would gladly do so, but in europe there is a little less demand for really big knives... I think the m7 is as large as it gets, then considering weight/portability it could be better to just switch to another dedicated tool (axe,saw,machete etc...). Maybe if there is enough demand lionsteel could think to produce a larger version.
     
    Mr.SATism likes this.
  3. Revolverrodger

    Revolverrodger KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jul 23, 2007
    They need to add a larger blade to their arsenal
    To me the small + large blade cimbo works great in the woods
     
    Mr.SATism and JackTheLad21 like this.
  4. ManRay

    ManRay Gold Member Gold Member

    547
    Oct 9, 2014
    Yes please!
     
    Revolverrodger likes this.
  5. molletta

    molletta Gold Member Gold Member

    Sep 1, 2004
    It's on work.
     
  6. Revolverrodger

    Revolverrodger KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jul 23, 2007
    VERY exciting news
    I hope you use a blade pattern similar to the m7
    It is the perfect pattern
     
  7. mark70

    mark70

    42
    Apr 8, 2017
    :) if lionsteel used steel sleipner also for the T5 would be welcome:)
    :) se molletta utilizzasse l'acciaio sleipner anche per il T5 sarebbe cosa gradita:)
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2018
  8. Revolverrodger

    Revolverrodger KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jul 23, 2007
    Any pictures of a prototype?
     
  9. MicroAlign

    MicroAlign Gold Member Gold Member

    395
    Feb 1, 2004
    Count me in for a M9! I seem to keep buying more and more Lionsteel creations in the last year. The quality is outstanding for the price, their heat treatment is precise, and I've really learned to appreciate the capabilities of Euro steels like Sleipner. Personally I hope that an M9 takes on more of a general purpose Bowie knife design with less belly to the point. I ultimately sold my M7 as I was not a fan of such a wide blade with so much belly towards the point. I much preferred the T5's profile. I really like the Bowie blade design on the Fallkniven Thor or Cold Steel Trail Master with a more conservative point design, flat blade grind, and a the edge position slightly forward of the blade axis. Either way, I look forward to seeing a Lionsteel M9 creation.
     
  10. MicroAlign

    MicroAlign Gold Member Gold Member

    395
    Feb 1, 2004
    ":) if lionsteel used steel sleipner also for the T5 would be welcome:)"

    Yes, after doing my own extensive testing on Niolox I prefer Sleipner in a large hard use fixed blade. T5 is probably small enough though that Niolox works fine.
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2018
  11. JackTheLad21

    JackTheLad21

    52
    Sep 17, 2017
    Could you elaborate on why?
    From what I read Sleipner is tougher but Niolox should have superior edge retention so in a 5 inches blade I would prefer the 2nd. What did you experience that leads you to prefer sleipner also in a small blade?
     
  12. Revolverrodger

    Revolverrodger KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jul 23, 2007
    Looking forward to see the design
     
  13. MicroAlign

    MicroAlign Gold Member Gold Member

    395
    Feb 1, 2004
    I have found that edge retention is such a tiny part of blade and edge durability. Edge retention is focused on essentially a linear cutting motion, excluding shear, twist, shock, and torquing forces. Sometimes cutting one particular material like cardboard or rope may also effect the edge is a manner than a polymer or wooden fiber may effect it in a totally different manner. For instance I once experienced a S90V blade chip its edge while cutting into the clear, tough plastic found on preformed store packaging. M390 did fine with it though. As for testing in the woods, a good test is making simple wood shaving for fire tinder by holding the blade 90 degrees to wood surface and first getting light feathers, and that grasping the blade with two hands to make deep cuts and larger tinder. This is very legitimate survival function of a knife, and especially with bamboo it really pressures the strength of an edge. Probably why the Japanese used rolled up bamboo mats for blade testing. Using Lionsteel blades(thus keeping the same quality of heat treat from the manufacturer), I found that Niolox tended to chip more when performing scraping tests and batoning trees for tasks such a shelter building. I found that M390 held up great in scraping tests, but not so great in batoning wood. In fact, I actually bent the edge on a Doug Ritter blade in M390, but in an apples to apples comparison the same knife in S30V did just fine in batoning. Sleipner did excellent in all my testing.

    So, sure steels like S90V, Niolox, or M390 may really shine in simple edge retention tests, but I do much more with a knife that just cut rope all day. The tiny advantage in edge retention disappears when you scrap off a handful of tinder shaving from a shaft of bamboo, as even the highest edge retention rated steels no longer shave the hair off of your arm after performing this task. The reason I really like Sleipner is that is retains many of the desirable properties of carbon steels, but has some good rust resistance as well. I sharpens much easier than higher chromium steels(a very nice thing if you have to rely on natural stones or a natural rock in the wild), it has the shock absorption of carbon steel, and it retains a very keen edge with ease.
     
    JackTheLad21 likes this.
  14. Kon

    Kon

    29
    Feb 15, 2018
    ...and what about the M6 ??
    I've been waiting for long time an (hopefully) stainless steel blade in this size from Lionsteel!
     
  15. Kon

    Kon

    29
    Feb 15, 2018
    Well...carbon steel was a better choice for a big knife "in the past time", but nowadays the new stainless steels have nothing less to offer than carbon steels.
    Just choose the right one and you will have the same performances of a carbon steel with an additional advantage: no maintenance needed!
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2018
    Revolverrodger likes this.
  16. JackTheLad21

    JackTheLad21

    52
    Sep 17, 2017
    An M6 in M390 or Elmax would be epic!
     
    Revolverrodger likes this.
  17. Kon

    Kon

    29
    Feb 15, 2018
    Yeah, it sounds erotic! :D:D
     
    Revolverrodger and JackTheLad21 like this.
  18. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 20, 2005
    I'm also waiting for a M6 (any good steel will do for me). I keep almost buying a M5 (4.5" blade) and then hesitate because I have a fair number in the 4- 4.5" size already. Basically I consider a 5 to 5.5" blade ideal as a general purpose woods blade. The bigger ones are great and I like them, but I know I won't carry one.
     
    Revolverrodger likes this.
  19. MicroAlign

    MicroAlign Gold Member Gold Member

    395
    Feb 1, 2004
    If you guys want a Lionsteel quality 6" blade designed for woods/survival, then you need to consider the DPx HEFT 6. Made by Lionsteel for DPx in Sleipner steel. Currently my favorite fixed blade.
     
  20. Kon

    Kon

    29
    Feb 15, 2018
    :eek: It's not the same!
    I prefer a typical Molletta styled knife, a sort of mini M7 with very little differences: classic overall shape....monoblock and very ergonomic handle (light brown or bright grey coloured please!) without finger notch....and, most important, stainless steel please!!! ;)
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2018
    Revolverrodger likes this.

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