My blade needs work...

Discussion in 'Maintenance, Tinkering & Embellishment' started by 67tony, Sep 26, 2020.

  1. 67tony

    67tony

    17
    Sep 26, 2020
    It's in good shape other than some tarnishing, if that's even the right word to describe it.
    I've tried WD-40, then PB Blaster, with some steel wool...but that didn't do much.

    I've got a bench grinder, and am fairly competent, so I'm wondering if there's a wheel, or product, or method to use in order to polish this blade back to shiny.

    Thanks for any thoughts or replies!

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    oldmanwilly likes this.
  2. Eli Chaps

    Eli Chaps Gold Member Gold Member Basic Member

    Apr 20, 2018
    It's just patina. High carbon steels do that.

    Just sharpen it and oil it and let it be. :)
     
    000Robert, mendezj, GABaus and 2 others like this.
  3. Mistman68

    Mistman68 Gold Member Gold Member

    305
    Apr 7, 2019
    Personally I wouldn't want to polish it up, it looks great as is, there's no active oxidation.

    Some people put a lot of effort into making new steel look like that, embrace the funk, it tells the story.
     
    mendezj, GABaus, Natlek and 1 other person like this.
  4. Bill DeShivs

    Bill DeShivs KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jun 6, 2000
    While it can be cleaned, it will always be obvious.
     
  5. Tjstampa

    Tjstampa Gold Member Gold Member

    345
    Mar 25, 2019
    Personally I would just put some oil on it for protection. If I were to polish it I would use flitz and a polishing wheel on a dremel. As @Bill DeShivs said you will be able to tell where it was cleaned
     
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  6. Ourorboros

    Ourorboros

    568
    Jan 23, 2017
    Patinas actually help protect the blade.
     
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  7. 67tony

    67tony

    17
    Sep 26, 2020
    Great replies, thanks a ton. I'm new to the forum, and already appreciate the expertise present.
    So...the quality of the steel determines whether the blade gets desirable patina, as opposed to tiny rust spots?
    Does the patina eventually turn to rust, or is it arrested by normal cleaning?
     
  8. Tjstampa

    Tjstampa Gold Member Gold Member

    345
    Mar 25, 2019
    A good patina bind the surface meteal and slow down the more destructive red and brown rust. However you should periodically check for the more damaging rust. IMO removing the patina will open the door to the possibility of the more damaging rust.
     
    GABaus likes this.
  9. 67tony

    67tony

    17
    Sep 26, 2020
    Awesome, that's good to know.
    I will monitor my collection, and be mindful of the condition of the blades.
    Even new blades need occasional light oil, right?
    Are there oils (or products) to avoid, and oils that are preferred?

    Sorry if these are basic questions!
     
  10. kvaughn

    kvaughn Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 28, 2005
    0000 steel wool and WD-40. Sharpen it and use it.--KV
     
  11. Tjstampa

    Tjstampa Gold Member Gold Member

    345
    Mar 25, 2019
    I have been using hopes gun oil, honing oil, and ballistal. Also mineral oil on kitchen and camping knives used for food prep and eating. I have also been following @razor-edge-knives corrosion testing thread.
     
    razor-edge-knives likes this.
  12. 67tony

    67tony

    17
    Sep 26, 2020
    Yes, I've done the WD-40 and steel wool method, followed up with some Mothers Mag & Aluminum polish.
    It seemed to work very well.

    Good point about mineral oil on food knives.
    I'd imagine WD-40 to have a bit of an aftertaste!
     
  13. Bill DeShivs

    Bill DeShivs KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jun 6, 2000
    WD 40 contains mineral oil.
     
  14. Ourorboros

    Ourorboros

    568
    Jan 23, 2017
    No, you'll get a patina with steels that have impurities like sulphur or phosphorus. It's largely a matter of what the iron is exposed to - you don't want a high moisture environment. Or high oxygen, but how often does that happen?
    The exception is if you have some acid in that moisture - like meat, mustard, some fruit mashes. But don't keep it in there forever.
    Cleaning and oiling is the way to go.

    Unless you are Japanese. Those guys will keep polishing a blade instead of using a patina as a semi-protective coating.
     

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