Ok you watch guys!

Discussion in 'Gadgets & Gear' started by Progunner, Oct 3, 2006.

  1. Progunner

    Progunner

    Oct 22, 2001
    I have looking at the GSAR and I am curious, does it have a break in time where you ought to let it run a few months before adjustment or what? Curious as to what this sort of time piece involves. I ask because I thought I read some where that the automatic movements sometime have to be adjusted after they are intially put into service. Am I wrong? I did a little looking here and there through google, but I am a knife guy and only went cross eyed trying to find said info.
     
  2. InsuranceGuy

    InsuranceGuy

    409
    Jul 12, 2006
    That is a controversial question. Many say there is a break in period, but no one in my watch forum has ever seen a watch actually "settle in" after a break in period. If it is off, it will remain off.
    How far off is it?
     
  3. Progunner

    Progunner

    Oct 22, 2001
    Maybe 5 min in two weeks. I am going to set it again tonight and let it go for a week so I can tell for sure. The last time I set it, I didn't recall what day it was, but I have this thread to remind me of when a week is up.

    Ok. I just set it again. 21:39:00 on 09/03/06.
     
  4. Point44

    Point44

    Jan 15, 2003
    Well, the watch will settle in after a couple of months. When I bought my Omega Planet Ocean it was quite accurate but now it gains like 5 minutes in 2-3 weeks. So i'm going to just send it in to be regulated but i just can't bear not having the watch with me even for a couple of days.
     
  5. InsuranceGuy

    InsuranceGuy

    409
    Jul 12, 2006

    That is the opposite of settling in.
    I have never heard of a case where a watch was inaccurate and over time became more accurate.
     
  6. InsuranceGuy

    InsuranceGuy

    409
    Jul 12, 2006
    Remember that COSC specs allow for a range of -4 to +6 seconds per day.

    I would go a little higher than that before sending it in to be regulated.
     
  7. Point44

    Point44

    Jan 15, 2003
    Insuranceguy,

    What i'm saying is that the movement needs to settle in before it 'stabilises'. Then when you regulate it, it will stay accurate over the long run compared to when you just started using it. Which is what i think Progunner is asking.

    Or are you saying that the movement doesn't need a breaking in period before regulating?
     
  8. Progunner

    Progunner

    Oct 22, 2001
    So 5 min in two weeks is not that big a deal then? I don't have a problem living with adjusting the time a couple a times a month for several months if that is what I have to do. I am kind of like point44 when it comes to this thing. I am quite fond of it already. Beats the hell out of the Accutron my dad dumped a bunch of cash on when I graduate high school. That thing has been back to the manufacturer at least three times since 1992 because the stop watch type feature on it doesn't work worth a damn.
     
  9. Blue Jays

    Blue Jays

    Feb 16, 2000
    Hi All-

    All automatic watches should be given several months to stabilize, allow the lubricants to move around, and parts to gently get into their groove. Don't send a watch to the shop for engineers to noodle around inside unless it is drastically too slow or too fast. People who have a fine automatic on their wrist rarely need to concern themselves with down-to-the-second timeframes. One is much better arriving a few minutes early for a train, flight, or important business meeting anyway. It leads to less stress.

    ~ Blue Jays ~
     
  10. InsuranceGuy

    InsuranceGuy

    409
    Jul 12, 2006
    I am saying that is a topic of some controversy. It is frequently stated that watches need a breaking in period, however none of the watch enthusiasts have ever seen a watch "settle in" after a break in period. Accurate watches stay accurate. Inaccurate watches either stay the same or get worse.
     
  11. InsuranceGuy

    InsuranceGuy

    409
    Jul 12, 2006

    5 minutes gain over 2 weeks works out to approximately a 21.4 second gain per day. That actually isn't all that crazy. Although out of COSC specs, many watches are allowed to be in that neighborhood. Honestly, I wouldn't regulate it. If it alters over time, I would consider sending it in for a service (usually recommended every 5 years) and asking them to regulate it while it is open. You really do want to minimize the amount of time the back is open.
     
  12. Point44

    Point44

    Jan 15, 2003
    With the Omega, i have 3 years warranty, so i think i'm going to send it in just before the 3 years are up.

    I don't really mind the watch not being that accurate. I have my Casio G-shock for that. Plus i'm never on time for anything anyway.
     
  13. InsuranceGuy

    InsuranceGuy

    409
    Jul 12, 2006

    My old G shock was actually very inaccurate. That is unusual for a quartz watch but it was true.
    It is a common misconception that quartz watches are all more accurate than all mechanical watches. The truth is that all quartz watches have the potential to be more accurate than all mechanical watches. In reality, quality control is key and many quartz watches are not QCed and leave the factory without being checked for accuracy.
     
  14. GarageBoy

    GarageBoy

    May 23, 2003
    My Seiko took approximately 3/4 of a year to slow down to normal. It came outta the factory five minutes fast each week
     
  15. DB1

    DB1

    619
    Jan 4, 2002
    From my own experiences with autos/mechanicals, I would suggest letting it settle for a few months to see what happens. There are other factors to consider with accuracy as well, such as how often you wear the watch, how wound it is (they tend to lose accuracy as they wind down), and in what position you place the watch while not wearing it (some positions seem to affect accuracy more than others).

    I have found that as an auto gets older (5-10 years) that it will tend to slow down slightly - this is likely due to the oils aging over time, but could also come from parts wear.

    Also, the movements themselves are a big factor in overall accuracy. I have several Seikos (7s26 movt.) that regulated are around +15, and a 35 year old Omega Speedmaster (recently regulated) that runs +1 :)

    The GSAR movement (ETA 2824) is capable of COSC specs when properly regulated.
     
  16. cpk

    cpk Basic Member Basic Member

    357
    Jul 26, 2002
    Hello, I would use the watch for a few months. Do you wear it all day? Also when you take it off how do you set it down. Some movements react different. I know there are pocket watch that are known as a 6 position watch. This refers to the way it is tested. I have an ETA 2824-2 that slowed down after a few years. It is within 1 sec a day. Insurance guy what is your watch forum name, and what type of watches are you into? Thanks
     
  17. InsuranceGuy

    InsuranceGuy

    409
    Jul 12, 2006
    I spend a lot of time using this handle at timezone.com
    I like Rolex, Breitling, Omega, Panerai, JLC, Seiko, Hamilton and one or two others. I know, I am all over the board with those.
     
  18. cpk

    cpk Basic Member Basic Member

    357
    Jul 26, 2002
    I have been lurking over there also. In fact I just picked up a couple from JLC, a RDM and a Grande Date Reverso. How about the crazy price increase on Rolex! I have been looking for a beater over there lately. I saw a Explorer I and a Seiko Master Marine on SC. I don't want to hijack this thread so I will start a new one.
     
  19. VampyreWolf

    VampyreWolf

    Feb 12, 2001
    G-100 ghock is out 3min in 10 months.... Ti Skagen is out about 5min in 6 months. I'm not complaining... I usually show up 15-20min early anyways.
     
  20. Progunner

    Progunner

    Oct 22, 2001
    I wear it daily and it lies flat on the night table when not in use. Is there a better position?
     

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