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OKC's SP series 1095 switch to 1075 steel...

Discussion in 'Ontario Knife Company' started by PocketKnifeJimmy, Jun 24, 2018.

  1. Yonose

    Yonose

    Jul 10, 2017
    Your link seemed to confirm what I said. “A salt water bath after heat treat” ie slowly cooling via salt water. I forgot to add the word “cooling” as I assumed it would be obvious. Thanks for the link though, good stuff. I wonder how they cool 5160.
     
  2. buckfynn

    buckfynn Gold Member Gold Member

    479
    May 1, 2011
    Please quote from my link where you see a salt water bath?

    All I see is that it mentions "molten" salt bath which is not the same as a water salt bath. Do you understand the difference between the two?
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2019
  3. buckfynn

    buckfynn Gold Member Gold Member

    479
    May 1, 2011
    @Yonose Below are photos of a show a molten salt bath in action.

    "Would like to share my process of heat treating CPM-3V,
    This was done at the knife shop of my friend. I lets the worker perform because molten nitrate salt is quit dangerous to who's inexperienced.
    Let the picture speak for itself :D
    Here is my process.
    Stainless foil wrapped
    Stress relief at 1125F soak 2hour, furnace cool overnight
    Austenitizing 1960F
    Quench in 500F molten nitrate salt, equalize for 2 minute
    Air cool
    Remove foil and straight to L2N, soak overnight
    2 x Temper at 400F each"
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    Compliments of shqxk. The initial thread can be found at this link at BF.
     
    Beastchopper and Yonose like this.
  4. dingy

    dingy

    Feb 19, 2008
    Hi Yonose, I have both 1075 and 1095 sp10s , just have expriences using 1095 ones , can you feel the diffriences between 1095 and 1075 ones on cutting and chopping retention?
     
  5. buckfynn

    buckfynn Gold Member Gold Member

    479
    May 1, 2011
    @Yonose In the link below is another interesting discussion here on BF concerning marquenching.

    Salt bath ?

    Notice in post # 2 of the thread by JCaswellwhere he mentions the potential dangers of water and oil when dealing with molten salt baths.

    ...I've used these things for probably 10 years and have never been burned (which is more than I can say for forging).
    Obviously you want to keep water or oil out of your salt bath when it's at temperature because these things cause sputtering and popping as they vaporize (in high-temp salt) and that can get messy and potentially dangerous. I always wear a full face shield and welding gloves when using the hot salts--usually a welding jacket too...
     
  6. Yonose

    Yonose

    Jul 10, 2017
    I can feel that the 1095 version works better at chopping, both in terms of performance and edge retention. It’s subtle, but with the weight of the blade being what it is it makes a difference to me. Batoning or prying, can’t really tell the difference. They both will chip and/or roll at the edge if abused.
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2019 at 8:15 AM
    buckfynn likes this.
  7. Yonose

    Yonose

    Jul 10, 2017

    You obviously know more (an incredible understatement)about the subject than myself. I didn’t mean that it was a bath comparable to a “warm water bath.” Different salts have different temperatures at which they change states, I guess I assumed there was something else in solution which brought that number down enough where it would cool, rather than reheat (or actually melt) the steel. That and the preface “mar”— meaning “sea” is apparently misleading to the uninformed. At those temperatures, is it possible that some elements from the salt combine with those of the steel? Specifically, sodium or potassium or calcium nitrate molecules unbonding and replacing some of the carbides with nitrides? I’m sure my utter lack of knowledge of the fundamentals of chemistry is frustrating, so apologies for that (both retroactively and in advance.)
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2019 at 8:35 AM
    buckfynn likes this.
  8. Yonose

    Yonose

    Jul 10, 2017
    Gotcha. I see what you mean.
     
    buckfynn likes this.
  9. dingy

    dingy

    Feb 19, 2008
    thank you for sharing your exprience , cool.
     
    buckfynn likes this.
  10. Roguer

    Roguer

    835
    Jan 5, 2015
    5160 SP-10 with full tang and micarta handle and solid pummel tang type like on RDs and such. Yes and with Hilt. :D
     
    Yonose and Beastchopper like this.
  11. mark70

    mark70

    37
    Apr 8, 2017
    in a website I read that the most recent models of sp-10 have a greater thickness around 6.80 mm instead of 6.35 mm

    it would be to check with users who have purchased newer models (from April, December 2016 / 2017/2018/2019), mine is from March 2016 the thickness is 6.35 mm

    :D (hypothesize) :D that Ontario when replacing steels in the SP-10 marine raiders from 1095c to 1075c it also increases the thickness thus compensating for the performance gap between the two steels taking it from 6.35 mm to 6.80 mm :D (repeated this is just my hypothesis) :D
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2019 at 3:10 PM

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