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Proper use of Renaissance Wax on wood-inlayed Sebenzas? Damascus blades?

Discussion in 'Chris Reeve Knives' started by OhioApexing, Jul 23, 2018.

  1. OhioApexing

    OhioApexing Sharpener Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    233
    Apr 17, 2018
    I’ve got my first brand-new Sebenza on the way (I’ve had used in the past, micarta only) and I see that CRK recommends using Renaissance Wax on both the inlays and Damascus blades. Note: I’ve got Thuya on the way.

    So how do I apply it? Put a coating on it, let it dry, then wipe as much off as possible? Or do I put it on and immediately take it off? Do I leave some behind?

    I’ve used Frog Lube on various carbon steels in the past to prevent oxidation, but even then I’ve always felt a bit of an oily sheen that I can notice if I drag my finger across it. Should I feel this on the inlays with the ren wax?

    Should I treat the whole damn knife, titanium and all, with it? Or just the inlays?

    It’s my understanding that the Damascus blades are stainless. Why does CRK recommend treating the blade steel too?

    Furthermore, I know that RW can’t be edible. Should I use Frog Lube on the blade steel (in case I use it for food) and RW on the rest?

    How often should I be treating the inlays/steel?
     
  2. Peter Hartwig

    Peter Hartwig

    Feb 29, 2008
    The ren Wax instructions-apply sparingly with soft cloth and buff gently. Dries hard instantly
    There would be no need to do more then the inlays. I don't know anything about Damascus blades, so it may be needed, but at one time they were not stainless and you may be looking at old info. I have used car wax on Carbon steel blades and it does work well at preventing rust.
    I bought it for Mammoth bark, but have yet to use it. I have never applied to my wood inlay that I bought in 2008.
    By the way Frog Lube is not edible, just non toxic
     
    expidia1 likes this.
  3. expidia1

    expidia1 Gold Member Gold Member

    593
    Feb 18, 2018
    Funny, I had the exact same questions after my Ren was delivered yesterday. Peter has giving a nice response. Im trying to protect my light box elder wood from absorbing dyes from my pants or jeans especially under the pocket clip.
     
  4. Wavicle

    Wavicle Gold Member Gold Member

    860
    Jul 22, 2014
    I was disappointed with Ren Wax when used on Damascus. First, the cloth you use to apply it will have the gray color of etched pattern on it indicating it's removing the etch. That, in turn, lowers the contrast. Second, if you are not extremely skilled in applying the wax it will leave a texture that reveals the way you wiped it on and since it dries instantly, you can't buff it off. I'm talking about a very thin application but when viewing the beautiful Damascus the wax ridges will show.

    Bottom line: Don't do it. I ended using a synthetic gun oil ever so lightly and that gives the Damascus a sheen and cranks up the contrast. However, it's not good for use with food.
     
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2018
    Tetsujin 140.6 likes this.
  5. expidia1

    expidia1 Gold Member Gold Member

    593
    Feb 18, 2018
    You meant "Ren" not Red . . . right?
     
  6. Peter Hartwig

    Peter Hartwig

    Feb 29, 2008
    Mineral oil is a go to for blades used in food prep.
     
    SALTY likes this.
  7. Wavicle

    Wavicle Gold Member Gold Member

    860
    Jul 22, 2014
    yes- thank the auto-correction for that.
     
  8. Tetsujin 140.6

    Tetsujin 140.6

    758
    Jan 4, 2011
    Hate to resurrect a dead thread, but I was considering posting on this same topic.

    I'm looking specifically for information about the application of Renaissance Wax to a Damascus blade. The CRK website indicates that the blades are leaving the shop with a coating of it on, but has anyone had success with additional applications to protect the contrast from fading? I have a new boomerang damascus pattern that I'd like to protect.

    I have a 10+ year old ladder damascus user (that is in need of a re-etching and spa in the near future) that I was considering testing the ren wax on, but I'm looking for additional information first.

    Any success or failure stories, with application method details, would be appreciated.

    Photo of user blade alongside new boomerang pattern for some visual interest.
    [​IMG]
     
    willard0341 and gaucheist like this.
  9. Silverstonev8

    Silverstonev8 Gold Member Gold Member

    298
    Jul 12, 2018
    I used it on a new raindrop once and the pattern was much less visible after that. I personally won’t do it again.
     
    Alsharif likes this.
  10. Tetsujin 140.6

    Tetsujin 140.6

    758
    Jan 4, 2011
    Thanks for your response. Any before and after photos by chance?
     
  11. Silverstonev8

    Silverstonev8 Gold Member Gold Member

    298
    Jul 12, 2018
    No photos
     
  12. Alsharif

    Alsharif Gold Member Gold Member

    453
    Jan 8, 2018
    It doesn’t make the damascus look any better. I wouldn’t use it again.
     
    Tetsujin 140.6 likes this.
  13. gaucheist

    gaucheist

    50
    Jan 26, 2019
    I’ve applied Ren Wax to several of my Damascus blades with zero ill-effects. In my experience, it doesn’t prevent the damascus from wearing on a user, but I still use it as a rust inhibitor during storage, since many of my damascus blades don’t see frequent use.

    I’ve found it easiest to apply a thin coat to the blade with the knife disassembled and buff with a cloth after the layer “hardens” which is almost instantly.

    No before pics, but here are some after shots following the cleaning and waxing of my Basketweave Large
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    cbr1000, Tetsujin 140.6 and Alsharif like this.
  14. jmclfrsh

    jmclfrsh

    Dec 1, 2012
    I’ve used it on my Winkler Damascus without any ill effects. One just wants to remove it immediately.
    I use it on my Macassar Ebony inlays, but NEVER on the titanium! I’ll bet it would be very hard to get off the bead-blasted finish, out of the tiny pores.

    it dries SO quickly that you need to be ready to take it off immediately or you’ll have a bigger problem than you started with, and will be very disappointed in the result.
     
    gaucheist and Tetsujin 140.6 like this.

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