Questions for the maker

Discussion in 'Osprey Knife & Tool' started by Osprey Knife & Tool, Jun 17, 2016.

  1. Warrior108

    Warrior108 Platinum Member Platinum Member

    Apr 24, 2012
    Hey Chris,

    I thought there was a thread talking about the differences between the Apache and Hunter but can't find it. Can you possibly elaborate on the differences between the two models, maybe including some measurements or descriptions of features/characteristics?

    Also, what types of pros/cons would there be with the addition of a swedge (unsharpened) on the Apache?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Osprey Knife & Tool

    Osprey Knife & Tool Moderator Moderator

    Jun 4, 2014
    I will start with the measurments (Hunter) OAL 9” Blade 4 1/2” (Apache) OAL 8 3/4” Blade 4 1/4, The knives are pretty similar in size and shape. My thought process when designing these two blades was to offer very similar feeling and looking blades so a user could choose between a working outdoors task oriented blade (Hunter), and an EDC oriented blade for more everyday carry tasks.

    The Hunter is slightly larger in Handle and blade length as well as the blade being more of a drop point shape verses the Apaches spear shaped Blade. In my opinion this blade is more comfortable for larger size hands and in turn the extra size in the handle allows for multiple hand positions while in use.

    The Apaches intended purpose as an EDC blade it is more compact in the handle and blade, making it easier to carry and conceal if need be. I personally believe that the spear point blade allows more versatillity in an EDC role. The point of the blade ends more centerline that the hunter allowing you to naturally index the point.


    As far as the difference between a Clip and Swedge a Clip is usually always sharpened a Swedge is not. Both allow for wieght reduction and better penetration. Some customers live in an area that doesnt allow double edged blades and a Swedge allows you to have the look without the edge per se. A clip that is sharpened would be more delicate but also give you a backside cutting edge if you so desire.
     
  3. Warrior108

    Warrior108 Platinum Member Platinum Member

    Apr 24, 2012
    Thanks Chris! This is exactly what i was looking for and makes complete sense. It was a bit difficult trying to figure this out just by looking at pics and specs. Once you know this info, the features then stand out a bit more looking at pictures.

    Good deal on the terminology too between clip and swedge. I thought they were interchangeable and you'd have either an unsharpened clip/swedge or a sharpened clip/swedge. A clip is likely (knife law interpretation is sketchy) illegal in TX so I'd have to be mindful of this.


    Thanks!
     
  4. TheAmish1

    TheAmish1

    259
    Jul 21, 2015
    Are you ever planning on making any zero edge scandi grinds like maybe on a Warthog
     
  5. Osprey Knife & Tool

    Osprey Knife & Tool Moderator Moderator

    Jun 4, 2014
    Yes I do, Its been a long while since I have done some. I will see about making some soon.
     
  6. FeralGentleman

    FeralGentleman RansomWildernessCo

    Nov 13, 2013
    Hey Chris just wondering if you have a profile in your current lineup that you consider a 'flagship' model and one you feel represents you best as a knifemaker? Are there any deeper significance or stories behind any of your designs? Will we ever see an OKT tanto or maybe a karambit?
     
  7. Warrior108

    Warrior108 Platinum Member Platinum Member

    Apr 24, 2012
    Hey Chris,
    Is there any rhyme or reason to doing 4 small pins vs 2 large pins? Is it determined by scale material or just a feeling the maker gets at the time? (my bog oak and G10 Hunters for example)

    Just curious, and it's fun to learn about the details that go into them.

    Thanks

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G890A using Tapatalk
     
  8. Osprey Knife & Tool

    Osprey Knife & Tool Moderator Moderator

    Jun 4, 2014
    It all gets decided in the first stages of making the knife. I generally wont put the larger pins in a wooden handle on a smaller knife. But other than that its pretty much just a feeling I get at the time, Sometimes I will make a blade with both pin layout options so I have the choice to choose when the time comes.
     
  9. TheAmish1

    TheAmish1

    259
    Jul 21, 2015
    I remember reading somewhere that you changed names on a few of the knives. If I recall the Warthog remained a Warthog but the Warthog Hunter changed ?
     
  10. Warrior108

    Warrior108 Platinum Member Platinum Member

    Apr 24, 2012
    Hey Chris,

    Another clip/swedge question for you. I know that a swedge can be sharpened after a sale but can you add a clip or swedge after a knife is done (e.g. one from a Thursday sale) or does that feature have to be inserted earlier in the process?


    Thanks,
    Jerry
     
  11. Osprey Knife & Tool

    Osprey Knife & Tool Moderator Moderator

    Jun 4, 2014


    A swedge I cannot not sharpen, a clip I can post sale. Swedges, and Clips are different in the way I approach them. A swedge is for looks and to thin the spine for better penetration. Typicaly the spine in the area of the swedge is to thick to put an edge on. A clip I plunge into the steel like I do when I grind the primary bevels. This allows me to put a micro bevel along the edge with relative ease. If I do leave a clip unsharpened for the Thursday's sale. I can sharpen it post sale. I can explain a little better soon with pictures.

    Both are something I plan for in advance pre heat treat

    As far as adding a swedge or clip post sale on a knife that did not have one is risky business there is the probability I could completely mess up an otherwise good knife. The swedge is less risky than the clip.

    I hope this helps answer your question a little I will post a more in depth answer when I get some pictures of the spine on both.
     
  12. Osprey Knife & Tool

    Osprey Knife & Tool Moderator Moderator

    Jun 4, 2014
    I discontinued the Warthog Hunter as is. I redesigned the Handle and renamed it the Trail Hand both have the same Blade profile. I still have the stencil so I can make it again in the future if I choose too. The reason behind this was to distinguish the 2 models better and to cut down on confusion between the similar names and profile shape.
     
  13. Warrior108

    Warrior108 Platinum Member Platinum Member

    Apr 24, 2012
    After I clicked the button to post, the heat treat part occurred to me and I thought it was a silly question. But now I'm glad I asked because it seems that clips and swedges aren't as similar as I thought they were.

    Thanks!
     
  14. Osprey Knife & Tool

    Osprey Knife & Tool Moderator Moderator

    Jun 4, 2014
    Danny, This was a really good question and a tough one for me to answer, I have thought about it for weeks, and probably too long. It is hard for me to pick one model over another to be called a flagship. The reason is I feel that I am still growing and evolving as a knifemaker and craftsman. I feel it would be premature for me to make that distinction. I intend on growing and evolving in my craft for years to come. I have set a high standard and goals for myself. I do hope at one point I can make that distinction. Each and every model I make I like and represents me in its own right.

    I also have intentions on diving into all different styles and contruction methods I will continue to make what I curently make and try new things as well.

    There are some deeper significance and stories to some of the models, I will revisit this question soon and answer that with a part 2

    The Karambit and Tantos are a big yes. I have no Idea when But I have a feeling I will be working on those sooner than later.


    I hope this answered part of your question and I apoligize it took so long for me to answer.
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2016
  15. FeralGentleman

    FeralGentleman RansomWildernessCo

    Nov 13, 2013
    Awesome stuff Chris and thank you for taking the time to answer questions in this thread. Looking forward to hearing more on your design philosophy and any other interesting bits on your profiles.

    My interest is definitely peaked on the new designs mentioned. It will be fun to watch how they develops
     
  16. Warrior108

    Warrior108 Platinum Member Platinum Member

    Apr 24, 2012
    Questions for Chris or anyone with first-hand experience (pun intended) ...

    How slick or grippy is the Thunderstorm Kevlar dry and wet? Please specify blood, sweat, water, etc. for wet comments.

    How slick or grippy is the Carbon Fiber dry and wet? Please specify blood, sweat, water, etc. for wet comments.

    How do they compare?


    Thanks in advance!
     
  17. Osprey Knife & Tool

    Osprey Knife & Tool Moderator Moderator

    Jun 4, 2014
    I would I can say for water and oil, Thunderstorm Kevlar will be more grippy by the nature of the material. It closley resemmbles a burlap. I find it how however more dense than Micarta. Carbon Fiber is an interesting material. It is slicker than the Kevlar but I would say more grippy than G10 polished out (not my sandblasted treatment though).

    Oil is another animal I found Micartas out perform G10 sandblasted or not in this category. Carbon Fiber gets pretty slick when covered in oil but gets more grip with water.

    So on a scale from from most grippy to least grippy.
    Sandblasted G10= to Sandblasted Micarta, Thunderstorm Kevlar, Carbon Fiber , G10 not sandblasted

    I hope this somewhat answers your question. I dont have any experince with these material and blood and I try not to sweat on them.:D

    I think FeralGentleman could probably give more insight into this he had a Mamushi that has Carbon Fiber and Kevlar together. I would be interest to hear his input on this.
     
  18. Warrior108

    Warrior108 Platinum Member Platinum Member

    Apr 24, 2012
    Somewhere along the lines I think there was mention that Chris' methods differ a bit in that, in addition to belt sanding the handle contours, he also does hand filing. What areas on what knives is hand filing done where it would make a difference above and beyond belt sanding. Basically, how does hand filing make a difference?

    Thanks
     
  19. Osprey Knife & Tool

    Osprey Knife & Tool Moderator Moderator

    Jun 4, 2014
    Jerry,
    Thank you for your question I had to think about this a few times while I was hand filing the knives. I needed to think about what it was exactly I was doing and how I could convey it to you guy's what it is I see and why I choose the methods I choose.

    After I am done shaping the handle with the grinder I always notice the same consintent inconsistancies in shap and symmetry. I assume this is from the way I machine the handle. I am not aware if this is only specific to me or not. I take the hand files to the whole surface of the handle at some point.

    I have developed a bit of a sequence I first visually inspect the knife. I make mental note and sometimes a mark with a china marker of the areas I want to pay attention more with the file. I start on the spines and cut with long parallel strokes to make sure the top and bottom of the handle are the same shape from front to back. I then turn the knife on its side and concentrate more on the what I call the cups in the handles (the depressions). Every knife is a little different and I adjust accordingly to obtian my desired contours and symmetry. The finger choils are aspects of my knives that I focus on heavily with the file. I find that it is difficult for me to obtain the desired contures and symmetry on the grinder. Hand files are my prefered method and I choose not to slack belt as a personal preferance I cant say that my method is superior to any one elses. It is just what works for me and how I prefer to achieve my final product.

    Without this step I don't believe I could provide you a knife with the contours and symmetry I strive to achieve in my work and you all have come to appreciate


    I will try and tke some pictures and maybe a little bit of video one day that better explains. If you look at the knives in your hand from different angles you can tell I spend sometime sculpting the handle and making sure the contours are where I want them.
     
  20. Warrior108

    Warrior108 Platinum Member Platinum Member

    Apr 24, 2012
    Hey Chris,

    I myself dislike those "Where do you see yourself in 5 years?" questions but do you foresee your business staying a 1-person show in the longer term?

    ~ Jerry


    edit: Feel free to reply "no comment" :)
     

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