Random Thought Thread

Discussion in 'Carothers Performance Knives' started by Nathan the Machinist, Jul 17, 2017.

  1. Box_Opener

    Box_Opener Gold Member Gold Member

    227
    Aug 21, 2018
    I like to make a small loop of dental floss and feed it through the lanyard hole. Then I use that to pull the paracord through.
     
  2. fonedork

    fonedork Platinum Member Platinum Member

    Jul 7, 2011
    That's exactly what I do. Then I decide I don't like lanyards and take the whole thing out.
     
  3. XtianAus

    XtianAus Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 3, 2016
    Hahaha, yes, absolute classic. Wish there was still the Macgyver mentality here. I have been tempted to carry an SAK and just risk it and see what happens. It is just such a grey area that it really could be a risk or could be absolutely fine..
     
    Odog27 likes this.
  4. Box_Opener

    Box_Opener Gold Member Gold Member

    227
    Aug 21, 2018
    Ha ha, me too. I hate how they flick against my wrist like a loose bracelet or something.
     
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  5. XtianAus

    XtianAus Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 3, 2016
    The independant and microbreweries are starting to become more popular as the hipster mentality has started to become a thing haha.

    We have beautiful and unique environment here, especially the great barrier reef but I love the look of your landscape. I'd love to visit America one day. I just hope things settle down there soon.
    But glad you enjoyed it here. We often get a bad wrap because of our harsh laws and restrictions. But it also really quite beautiful and safe here
     
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  6. SharpPancake

    SharpPancake Gold Member Gold Member

    181
    Dec 30, 2018
    Yeah, I was thinking about it. And also I was thinking about removing the scales.
    But then I embraced my inner barbarian and pushed that piece of ........ paracord thru it and showed it who is the boss (not me, Nathan is the boss).
     
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  7. fonedork

    fonedork Platinum Member Platinum Member

    Jul 7, 2011
    I have a friend who was a designer for Bethesda games, he designed the deathclaws in Fallout and the dragons and other monsters and some of the weapons in Skyrim. He didn't design the blade of woe but I took the liberty of sending him your pics of the knife and he was moved by the quality of your work. As I am. One day I hope to buy a knife from you!
     
  8. Richard338

    Richard338 Gold Member Gold Member

    May 3, 2005
    Wow, that's too cool. Thanks for sending him the pics, I'll bet my kids will be impressed!
     
  9. co556guy

    co556guy

    Dec 13, 2011
    There are quite a few issues under the surface that prevent thinning in the USA.

    A large part of it is legacy views within agencies, budgets that do not allow for the NEPA to even be written (let alone actually do the work) and that's not even counting the people who don't really understand ecological processes enough to understand the need, nor being willing to accept that natural cycles that maintained these systems are not static, not pretty, and that they aren't static.

    Lodgepole pine for example....
    They need fire to completey burn out old stands in order for regeneration to occur. Clearcutting is the closest approximation of a stand clearing fire, but it looks like hell. Laymen hate it. They sue over it. Yet a lodgepole stand at about 200yrs becomes old and decadent. Without a stand clearing fire, the new cohort cannot develop in the way the species is adapted to regerate.

    Our problem is much deeper than most understand.

    Throw in encroachment of homes in the interface zones and now we are stopping fires to protect human interests, yet fuels continue to build, systems continue to diverge from functional and humans forget these systems need to have these events to maintain heathy processes.

    All in all, "apex community" thought is incorrect and rooted in human values, not natural processes. Trying to force nature to do or look how we want is a large part of our problem, combined with not being able to accept that what we humans consider to be destructive is more akin to doing a clense instead of getting hit by a car. We manage for short term outcomes while it took many many human lifetimes for the homeostasis we perceive to be realized.

    TL:DR: americans are unwilling to accept the visuals of practices needed to set our lands back on a natural successional path because we want them to stay the same.
     
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  10. The Amazing Virginian

    The Amazing Virginian Gold Member Gold Member

    Feb 24, 2010
    So basically . . . Estonians are smarter than Americans. Which surprises me not even a little bit.
     
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  11. BIGDORK

    BIGDORK Gold Member Gold Member

    494
    May 27, 2018
    Officially ready for summer
    [​IMG]
     
  12. co556guy

    co556guy

    Dec 13, 2011
    More like industrial forestry is a different monkey than management of natural forests, with the side benefit of not being run by a mob of lawyers.

    There is no "get it all" outcome for the US. We can choose to manage for many uses, if we accept impacts. We can manage with the intent to preserve, but even our national parks (which use a preservational attitude) are still being managed to maintain how they are now, instead of the range of variability nature demands.

    Another good example is rivers. They naturally flood, meander, move, etc. Humans hate that. We hate floods, we hate it when our structures built on floodplains are now in the channel, we hate it. Yet we like fertile land, and we like having water.

    So, we create a channel, line it in concrete and run it in a straight line.

    Outcome: higher water velocity, fish population takes a hit, and we remove small floods (but we take out all resilience, so big floods are way worse on us) and we lose deposition of nutrents on those fertile lands near rivers.

    Then we are forced to create other solutions to solve the problems we created in an effort to outthink nature, but we only end up making things worse, less stable over time and give ourselves a false sense of stability in the short term.

    Humans are smart. We modify our world to fit our wants. That is OK, but we also don't like paying our bills when they come due.
     
  13. Nathan the Machinist

    Nathan the Machinist KnifeMaker / Machinist / Evil Genius Moderator Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Feb 13, 2007
    ^ remarkably intelligent thoughtful discussion on an esoteric subject for a knife forum.

    :thumbsup:
     
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  14. Lorien

    Lorien KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Dec 5, 2005
    I just finished reading both posts and had the exact same thought, plus a few others.
    Thank you @co556guy
     
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  15. SharpPancake

    SharpPancake Gold Member Gold Member

    181
    Dec 30, 2018
    I went a bit HAM while sharpening my FK2 and scratched the primary bevel. Did anyone tried to repair the stonewash finish at home?
    Something like bucket of rocks and shake the blade inside it.
     
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  16. co556guy

    co556guy

    Dec 13, 2011
    Thanks guys. I am humbled by your appreciation.
     
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  17. TRfromMT

    TRfromMT Gold Member Gold Member Basic Member

    Jan 4, 2016
    I've seen homemade tumblers made from a chunk of 4" pvc pipe with threaded caps. Fill with small pea gravel (not rocks) and a quarter cup of windex, wrap in a heavy beach towel and secure the towel with bungee cords. Throw that in the dryer for an hour, no heat.

    Do this when the wife/g.f./s.o. is out of the house.

    Plan on sharpening for the rest of the weekend.


    Or use the $#it outta it and camouflage it with more scratches.
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2021
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  18. Nathan the Machinist

    Nathan the Machinist KnifeMaker / Machinist / Evil Genius Moderator Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Feb 13, 2007
    I've tried every alternative tumble media. None works very well. It will be scratched to shit and shiny, not even and frosty. I don't recommend it. Use the real deal or don't bother. Also, this is Delta 3V at HRC 60.5 with a ton of vanadium carbide. A dinky little tumbler doesn't have enough energy to do the job very well. If you don't need hearing protection just to be around it, it probably isn't going to work.

    Deep scratches won't tumble out very well. Sometimes a knife needs a light finish grind before tumbling or the flaws are still there.

    I recommend using the knife and don't worry about some scratches. Trying to keep a tool pristine will just prevent you from using it and enjoying it for what it really is.
     
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  19. SharpPancake

    SharpPancake Gold Member Gold Member

    181
    Dec 30, 2018
    Yeah, after thinking more about it, I think I am going with the lazy way...not doing at all with it.
     
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  20. The Amazing Virginian

    The Amazing Virginian Gold Member Gold Member

    Feb 24, 2010
    Thanks.

    Ok, but is there some reason that a YUGE country like the USA (3.8 million sq. mi.) does not have sufficient "industral forestry" to satisfy its firewood needs without literally going to a teeny tiny country like Estonia (17,000 sq. mi) and shipping firewood (firewood!) on a ship at least 4000 miles across the Baltic Sea, the North Sea, and the Atlantic Ocean all the way to the USA? Just does not make any sense to me - I'm still missing something.
     
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