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Saber grind

Discussion in 'Shop Talk - BladeSmith Questions and Answers' started by rjedoaks, Mar 23, 2019.

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  1. rjedoaks

    rjedoaks Gold Member Gold Member

    217
    Sep 15, 2009
    6D556CEB-0B13-4A7A-BC31-4CA4038CB7A3.jpeg I’ve done mostly scandi bush knives and a few full flat grinds. My question is, when sanding the flats on a saber. This needs to be done before the finish grind? My intention is to bring the grind up just below my mark. Thanks
     
  2. Laredian

    Laredian

    140
    May 27, 2013
    Can you elaborate? I don't quite understand your question.
     
  3. rjedoaks

    rjedoaks Gold Member Gold Member

    217
    Sep 15, 2009
    I don’t have pics but after finishing the grind, sanding the small portion that’s left, gave a uneven grind line. In other words, in what progression should the flat portion left be finish sanded. I might still be unclear. Rich
     
  4. john april

    john april KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Feb 27, 2006
    i agree its kind of hard to tell what you are asking. i am pretty sure a saber grind is only half the width of the blade, but if you want to get closer to your makers mark, i would grind with a 120 grit belt about 1/8" away from where you want the final grind line to be in relation to your mark. the other grits in progression will hopefully remove the last 1/8".
     
  5. john april

    john april KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Feb 27, 2006
    most people use 60-120-220-400-600-1000 as far as grits go. you can stop at 400 and have a nice looking finish, its up to you.
     
  6. rjedoaks

    rjedoaks Gold Member Gold Member

    217
    Sep 15, 2009
    I understand now, wrong terminology. The grind is not my problem, the portion left where my mark is, that’s the issue. That portion where my mark is needs to be finished before the finished grind? Thanks Rich
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2019
  7. Bill DeShivs

    Bill DeShivs KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jun 6, 2000
    Generally, when polishing, flats should be finished last.
     
  8. rjedoaks

    rjedoaks Gold Member Gold Member

    217
    Sep 15, 2009
    That’s what I did originally. The grind line wasn’t crisp anymore after sanding. I cleaned it up with another pass on the grinder. Just wondering what everyone else does
     
  9. Laredian

    Laredian

    140
    May 27, 2013
    I can only speak for myself, but in my opinion the flats of you blade should be finished before you grind your bevels because they form the basis of your grind and the basis from where you scribe your lines.
     
  10. rjedoaks

    rjedoaks Gold Member Gold Member

    217
    Sep 15, 2009
    Thanks, finishing prior to grinding seems logical.
     
  11. Rhinoknives1

    Rhinoknives1 KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jul 1, 2013
    I do all of my grinding post HT, I take the FFG & flat of the logo as you’ve call it to 120G ————-Then do my FFG & Flats with 400G and then final finish with my Scotch brite fine & super fine... I finish the Logo Flats, to a higher finish, so the Logo stencil has a fine finish to etch on...
     
  12. rjedoaks

    rjedoaks Gold Member Gold Member

    217
    Sep 15, 2009
    Thanks good to know
     
    Rhinoknives1 likes this.
  13. razor-edge-knives

    razor-edge-knives Moderator Moderator Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Apr 3, 2011
    I take my flats to 400+ grit prior to the grind (any lower and you will have scratches bleeding into the grind). Then knock your saber grind out and you can then go back to your granite plate at 400+ grit for a few passes to clean up any stray scratches that may have happened on the flats during grinding.
     
    E.Carlson likes this.
  14. rjedoaks

    rjedoaks Gold Member Gold Member

    217
    Sep 15, 2009
    Thanks everyone, always a helpful bunch.
     
  15. scott kozub

    scott kozub Gold Member Gold Member

    322
    Jan 1, 2018
    Make sure when your sanding your flats you have a hard backing. Steel is best. If there is any give it'll washout or blur the crisp grind line. Also, the higher up the blade you go with your bevel or the thinner the stock, the more pronounced waves or bluring will be as the angle between the flat and bevel becomes less. A clean straight saber line is hard to get on thin stock. At least it is my my limited abilities anyways.

    That being said, your lines look pretty good as is. You could maybe bring the grind up at the tip a little and the bevel is getting narrower.
     
  16. rjedoaks

    rjedoaks Gold Member Gold Member

    217
    Sep 15, 2009
    Thanks
     
  17. Stacy E. Apelt - Bladesmith

    Stacy E. Apelt - Bladesmith ilmarinen - MODERATOR Moderator Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Aug 20, 2004
    I consider a sabre grind one done on thicker stock and going only 1/.2 the way up the blade. It follows the edge curve.... just like the grind on a sabre.
    There should be a small secondary edge bevel to make the sharp edge. The edge pre-secondary is rather thick compared to most grinds.
     
  18. E.Carlson

    E.Carlson KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    688
    Mar 28, 2016
    I've been trying to figure the same thing out. I've decided on my current project i'm going to grind the bevels to 220, finish the flats, then go back to the bevels for 400 and scotchbrite, and pray I keep my lines crispy.
    I'll let you know how it works out.
     
  19. rjedoaks

    rjedoaks Gold Member Gold Member

    217
    Sep 15, 2009
    Stacy, thanks for the clarification.
    E.Carlson, definitely interested.
     

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