Saddle axe ;)

Discussion in 'Axe, Tomahawk, & Hatchet Forum' started by ipt, Mar 7, 2017.

  1. ipt

    ipt

    60
    May 14, 2013
  2. Woodcraft

    Woodcraft

    796
    Nov 7, 2016
    ;)
    Lol. I think the American claim to fame of both the polled balanced felling axe and the invention of the double bitted felling axe is safe. Those are cute little trinkets though......
     
  3. FortyTwoBlades

    FortyTwoBlades Baryonyx walkeri Dealer / Materials Provider

    Mar 8, 2008
    Of course it wasn't an American invention! America just used 'em a lot more than any other nation in the post-industrial age. Most ancient double bits I've seen were ceremonial and/or weapons, but the geometry on these definitely looks to be more of a tool, and that's pretty notable. Thanks for sharing! :)

    Edit to add: Also, America didn't invent curved handles, either. Check this 2,400-year-old Irish socket axe with two-piece handle. Surprisingly modern lines, no?
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2017
  4. Moonw

    Moonw

    Nov 19, 2014
    It would seem the Thracians may have had "some" head start on US :), Woodcraft.

    It wouldn't be the first time, the same implement is re-invented at differen places and times.
     
  5. ipt

    ipt

    60
    May 14, 2013
    Yeah!

    ;))
    I was starting to be doubt about fire and the wheel...
    About axe- it looks fresh, very modern and simple- ergonomic tool...
    The viking era will come after ~800- 1000 years...
    2400 old tool.
     
  6. Moonw

    Moonw

    Nov 19, 2014
    42, some of the Irish were sometimes fond of harder liquors. It is not a stretch of imagination to assume that the carver intended that handle to be straight, but it came out that way :D. (Runs for cover...)

    Everyone knows the first curved handle intended as such was carved in US. (Still running...:D )

    (Oh, and Australians are strange, I heard it here :p.)
     
  7. jblyttle

    jblyttle

    Sep 3, 2014
    I resemble that comment.
     
  8. ipt

    ipt

    60
    May 14, 2013
    I was inspired from this:

    "The first double-bit ax was probably made by William Mann in Pennsylvania at about 1850."
     
  9. Woodcraft

    Woodcraft

    796
    Nov 7, 2016
    I would imagine that when faced with a simular problem multiple people separated by time and space come up with very similar tools to solve the problem. But half the fun is claiming people who stood on the same dirt you do did it first:) Regardless of how accurate the claim is.
     
  10. Moonw

    Moonw

    Nov 19, 2014
    Haha, so true! :)
     
  11. Moonw

    Moonw

    Nov 19, 2014
    :D

    No one triggered yet?
     
  12. Moonw

    Moonw

    Nov 19, 2014
    I remember reading that here. He surely revived an excellent tool and made it so popular, he was the modern father of the double-bit.
     
  13. garry3

    garry3

    Sep 11, 2012
    Just goes to show you that it is best to follow in the footsteps of those that went before you. Its a mantra that I try very hard to follow. There is an obvious bias by a few on this forum for all axes made in America, including some modern ones that are soft as butter and no where near premium quality.

    Did I really say that?!:eek:
     
  14. Whiskey_Jim

    Whiskey_Jim

    362
    Feb 21, 2017
    [​IMG]
     
  15. phantomknives

    phantomknives

    Mar 31, 2016
    HEY WOAH, WOAH, THEM THERE ARES FIGHTIN WORDS. but yea, poll axes are what we can find so obviously we love them and are biased. if deadbox sees this, he's got a few poll-less axes, maybe he can see which, if any are better. BUT, the heavy basques would need heavy american axes to be fair
     
  16. Agent_H

    Agent_H

    Aug 21, 2013
    I would agree with that.
     
  17. FortyTwoBlades

    FortyTwoBlades Baryonyx walkeri Dealer / Materials Provider

    Mar 8, 2008
    DBH recently did a video comparing a GB SFA, Council Woodcraft Pack Axe, Jauregi (don't know which model), and a 700g (1.5lb) Rinaldi "American" pattern.
     
  18. phantomknives

    phantomknives

    Mar 31, 2016
    i saw, but i didnt think it would fit the situation very well
     
  19. Woodcraft

    Woodcraft

    796
    Nov 7, 2016
    Yes, that video should be posted here. Especially the part at the endish where his friend uses the Rinaldi.
     
  20. FortyTwoBlades

    FortyTwoBlades Baryonyx walkeri Dealer / Materials Provider

    Mar 8, 2008
    Probably a better comparison for overall stylistic comparison would be something like a couple of 3.5lb American and Swedish models along with a 1.5kg Jauregi and a 1500g (yes, 1.5kg, but Rinaldi uses grams) Cadore or other similar large pattern with the Jauregi and Rinaldi on handles equal in length to the Americans. Most Italian axes top out at 1300g, though. Rinaldi only makes a few models as heavy as 1500g, those being the "American", "Normal", and "Cadore" (both wide and narrow bit) as well as a splitting axe. The heaviest model they make is their racing axe at 1800g (4lb).
     

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