How To Sharpening using DMT

Discussion in 'Maintenance, Tinkering & Embellishment' started by upstate88, Oct 24, 2020.

  1. upstate88

    upstate88

    13
    Dec 18, 2014
    I have a pair of DMT 10" duos. One is a course and extra course, and the other is the fine extra fine. I am hoping folks can suggest some specific videos, resources, tips for sharpening. I am getting better, but I can not get that final true shave sharp. I seem to have a hard time matching and maintaining the angle. I am going to grab a beater knife out of the garage today, roll the edge, fix, and repeat.
     
    Dangerously likes this.
  2. skyhorse

    skyhorse Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 30, 2010
    You could make a simple jig from a piece of 2x4 to get you going.
     
  3. Twindog

    Twindog Gold Member Gold Member

    Apr 6, 2004
    Something like Skyhorse said, you could make a ramp to hold the stones. Set the ramp at the angle you want to sharpen -- say 15 degrees to give you a 15 dps edge. Then hold the blade horizontal while sharpening. It's a lot easier to hold a blade horizontal than at some angle.

    Basically, it's like the Sharpmaker, but horizontal rather than vertical.
     
    Ben Dover and mendezj like this.
  4. skyhorse

    skyhorse Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 30, 2010
    When I have to re profile to a blade to a specific angle , cut one end of the top piece to your desired angle. Pre drill two holes from the bottom into the top , slap on a little wood glue and fasten the screws .
    [​IMG]
     
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  5. upstate88

    upstate88

    13
    Dec 18, 2014
    I have been using the base that came with the stones. Am I correct in thinking that working off a flat table might be what is making it hard?
     
  6. Eli Chaps

    Eli Chaps Gold Member Gold Member Basic Member

    Apr 20, 2018
    Mark the bevel with a Sharpie and be sure to remove it across the entire width.

    Raise a burr on one side, flip, raise a burr on the other side, then very, very lightly deburr with edge trailing strokes. Very lightly strop on some cardboard or such.

    Your steel type will dictate some things.

    Diamonds need light pressure. Diamonds are very aggressive on softer steels. I don't use them for the soft stuff.

    Start course, establish an apex and deburr. Should shave arm hair even if it is ragged. Jump to fine and repeat. Stop and see how you like it.

    Three biggest issues in sharpening: 1) Not fully apexing, 2) Crushing the apex downstream (often during deburring), 3) Not deburring properly.
     
  7. Eli Chaps

    Eli Chaps Gold Member Gold Member Basic Member

    Apr 20, 2018
    There is no reason you can't lay the stones flat and sharpen. That is how you should do it.

    You can build a jig but then you still have to hold the knife straight up and down. You're just swapping what is angled and what is straight.
     
  8. skyhorse

    skyhorse Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 30, 2010
    Not at all, you could cut a simple wedge to maintain an angle for using the stone on a flat surface also.
     
  9. skyhorse

    skyhorse Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 30, 2010
    Use a sharpie to make sure you’re hitting the apex and it’s all gravy :thumbsup::)
     
  10. Alberta Ed

    Alberta Ed

    Jun 29, 1999
    I found the DMT DuoBase to be well worth the money --no more sliding around on a mouse pad and it makes it much easier tomaintain a consistent angle, which is the key to sharp edges. I have a DuoSharp 8" Extra Coarse (220 grit) and a 10" double-sided fine(600 grit)/ultra fine (1200 grit). I use the Extra Coarse for establishing a bevel and finish on either the fine or ultra fine, depending on the steel. An angle guide helps a great deal in creating the primary bevel; there are several makes that clamp on the back of the blade. A cheapo guide can be made by taping a coin of appropriate thickness to each side of the blade.
     
    Ben Dover likes this.
  11. soc_monki

    soc_monki Basic Member Basic Member

    Apr 5, 2019
    I hold my stones in my hand, and I can look at the edge and make sure its touching the stone. It's kind of a modified Michael Christy technique. I just got a dmt extra coarse 6x2 stone and mounted it to a piece of scrap wood i had because it was too thin for me to hold comfortably. Might be a bit harder for you to do considering the size of your stones however!
     

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