Spent the afternoon cutting Oak

Discussion in 'Axe, Tomahawk, & Hatchet Forum' started by David Martin, Dec 10, 2017.

  1. Hairy Clipper

    Hairy Clipper Basic Member Basic Member

    415
    Feb 28, 2009
    That sounds a lot like the Dutch Elm Disease that killed most of the Elm trees here in Minnesota years ago. The Elms were dying off at a pretty fast pace back in the 1970s here. The only positive was if you knew where a downed elm tree was you would find so many Morel Mushrooms that we would fill several large paper grocery bags full. We didn't know any better back then. Now we use net bags so the mushroom spores have a chance to escape and grow more mushrooms rather than be contained in the paper bag.
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2020
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  2. David Martin

    David Martin Moderator Moderator Gold Member

    Apr 7, 2008
    Ok, here's my Hults with a new haft. 30 mins. to set and 15 to scrape. For this ax
    there is no haft I can find that is a good fit for its eye. As the eye is large. So, for me this is decent. DM
    20200807_081959.jpg
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2020
  3. Trailsawyer

    Trailsawyer Gold Member Gold Member

    71
    Jul 6, 2015
    Looks good! Ready to go back to work.
     
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  4. David Martin

    David Martin Moderator Moderator Gold Member

    Apr 7, 2008
    A different angle. DM
    20200807_082908.jpg
     
  5. David Martin

    David Martin Moderator Moderator Gold Member

    Apr 7, 2008
    20200807_124602.jpg Ok, thanks Trailsawyer. I oiled the end, sharpened it to the fine India and wrapped a
    shirt sleeve near the ax and took it for a test drive on some Emory oak.
    Here were are at work. This wood was cut in March. So, not thoroughly cured.
    It took 7 hits before it split and had a dead core. The next log left is also Emory. The third log is live oak. Notice the bark and color of the wood is different .
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2020
  6. David Martin

    David Martin Moderator Moderator Gold Member

    Apr 7, 2008
    Here is an adult Califorina bore beetle. Have you seen one? DM
    20200807_130630.jpg
     
  7. Square_peg

    Square_peg Basic Member Basic Member

    Feb 1, 2012
    Our cedars seem immune to them as well as most Doug fir. Our bark beetles go mostly for deciduous trees.

    Western hemlocks are being attacked by a blight, likely rhizoctonia.
     
  8. David Martin

    David Martin Moderator Moderator Gold Member

    Apr 7, 2008
    Square Peg, that's a fungus and can be killed by winter cold. I'm glad its not the bark beetle. Thanks, ax men. DM
     
  9. David Martin

    David Martin Moderator Moderator Gold Member

    Apr 7, 2008
    I cut, split and hauled a 1/4 cord yesterday, into the barn. It was like 87*. But it kicked me. So, not doing that for another month. It was mostly a dying Live oak tree. So, my Hults worked fine on it. But a different story on the Emoy oak. I have
    This winter's wood in the dry and the next winter's wood curing. So, I'll work on hanging another haft. DM
     
  10. David Martin

    David Martin Moderator Moderator Gold Member

    Apr 7, 2008
    I found another bore beetle while out cutting oak. DM
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  11. David Martin

    David Martin Moderator Moderator Gold Member

    Apr 7, 2008
    Yesterday I cut a few wheelbarrows of oak. Mostly dead wood and hauled it to the barn. It being a nice day and the high was only 70*. Here at mid- Sept. lots of men are out cutting their fire wood. DM
     
  12. David Martin

    David Martin Moderator Moderator Gold Member

    Apr 7, 2008
    Here's the fruits of my labor from back in July. DM
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    Last edited: Oct 27, 2020
  13. David Martin

    David Martin Moderator Moderator Gold Member

    Apr 7, 2008
    We ended the day with 7". Glad I didn't have to get out and cut more wood. Mostly I shoveled snow off porches and kept the ice broke for livestock. Plus, kept the house warm. More of the same tomorrow. DM
     
  14. David Martin

    David Martin Moderator Moderator Gold Member

    Apr 7, 2008
    20201115_194220.jpg Here we are between cold snaps and I'm filling the wood box. It takes 3 loads of this heaping wheelbarrow. About 1/5 cord which lasts 2 weeks depending on weather and cold snaps. From the barn to the porch, I have it filled.. DM
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2020
  15. David Martin

    David Martin Moderator Moderator Gold Member

    Apr 7, 2008
    I finally got the picture to load. DM
     
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  16. flexo

    flexo

    327
    Mar 14, 2013
    dog is so bored!
     
  17. David Martin

    David Martin Moderator Moderator Gold Member

    Apr 7, 2008
    Sure he is cause, it's just cord wood and not quail. DM
     
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  18. David Martin

    David Martin Moderator Moderator Gold Member

    Apr 7, 2008
    Last Saturday we had some strong winds and it snapped at lot of limbs in trees. This being one which I cut up today. And more to cut and split tomorrow. I'm holding my Hults which I used for limb work. As it didn't work for splitting, being only 4 lbs.. The Council did work well being 6 lbs.. DM
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    Last edited: Nov 23, 2020
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  19. David Martin

    David Martin Moderator Moderator Gold Member

    Apr 7, 2008
    Ok this is the haft I put on in Jan. 'this year'. I may have split a little more that 20 rounds with it. Today splitting the round it's laying on it bit the dust. I have not over struck with it. So much for giving it special mounting treatment. It lasted less than 1 year use. Close to normal for my Emory oak. DM
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    Last edited: Nov 30, 2020 at 8:25 PM
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  20. tiguy7

    tiguy7 Gold Member Gold Member

    Jun 25, 2008
    They say that a well glued joint is stronger than the wood itself. Now you have a way to test the theory.
     
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