Photos Stanley Axes, Hatchets, Tools - Show & Tell

Discussion in 'Axe, Tomahawk, & Hatchet Forum' started by Miller '72, Jul 28, 2018.

  1. Downwindtracker2

    Downwindtracker2

    132
    Mar 20, 2019
    If you look up Stanley England it should give a time line on their company acquisitions . I think they took over Harwood, who made American style braces. This is from my memory, which is like an old rusty can, kinda leaky.

    Yes ! Braces are very handy, they are surprisingly fast and easy for drilling wood. They are THE tool to drive large slotted screws. They are a required tool for working on a wooden boat.
     
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  2. Brian Rust

    Brian Rust

    762
    Nov 14, 2017
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    Here are two Stanley 5 1/4s. I found these two sitting together in a little shop. They were in pretty good shape but I restored them and sharpened the irons to a mirror polish. One has the number 14 lighting ingraved in the jappaning and the other a number 25. I’m betting these two planes where in a high school shop class sometime in the 1930’s. Some literature says these planes were made for schools and training purposes. Others say it’s just because people with small hands wanted them. I’m leaning forwards schools though!
     
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  3. Square_peg

    Square_peg Basic Member Basic Member

    Feb 1, 2012
    In my younger years as carpenter I carried a Stanley #99 retractable utility knife - probably for 15-20 years. Then I witched to the 10-079 or 10-179 retractable for the better grip. That's a fine utility knife. But for the past 10 years one of my EDC's has been a Stanley Quik-Slide Sport. It's plenty of utility knife for a carpenter and it has a lock blade sport knife built in. All for about $18. What would you hesitate to do with an $18 knife? Nothing. I abuse the crap out of it. Then sharpen it till it's too short and by another.
     
  4. Downwindtracker2

    Downwindtracker2

    132
    Mar 20, 2019
    "In my younger years as a carpenter I carried a Stanley #99 " me too. I worked on crew of Finnlanders, they carried instead skoyd knives. Now I have a Stanley Max and Bessey lock back. Both take those same #92 blades I used in the #99. Both are much easier to change the blade then using a nail to unscrew the screw.
     
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  5. Square_peg

    Square_peg Basic Member Basic Member

    Feb 1, 2012
    And that's exactly how we did it. That's part of the reason I kept a small whetstone in my nailbags, to touch up that utility knife. It was faster to touch it up than change the blade.
     
  6. Old Axeman

    Old Axeman Basic Member Basic Member

    855
    Jan 10, 2015
    Brian Rust-- 50 years ago I taught a evening adult education hand tool class at a high school wood shop. The shop was full of older Stanley
    5 1/4 planes. Also, Stanley mentions this use for the 5 1/4 in some of their older catalogs. I do not have a small hand, but the 5 1/4 is still one of my favorite hand planes. It is like using a # 3, just a little longer.
     
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  7. Old Axeman

    Old Axeman Basic Member Basic Member

    855
    Jan 10, 2015
    I was sitting here remembering teaching that class I mentioned and it dawned on me that a very talented young carpenter in the class was none other than Christian Becksvoort. For those of you who read "Fine Woodworking" magazine, Chris is a contributing editor. For many years Chris has written many articles and books on woodworking. He just sent me a copy of his latest book "Shaker Inspirations". I highly recommend it!
    Even though we live half a world apart, we still stay in touch. I even sent him a small piece of Koa to play with instead of all that fine cherry and maple he usually works with in his shop in Maine.
     
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  8. Brian Rust

    Brian Rust

    762
    Nov 14, 2017
    Wow that is awesome! Thank you for commenting on your experience. That confirms my thoughts. I knew I read it somewhere in some Stanley literature I just can’t remember where....

    Also, big thanks to A17!!!!! He sent me a bunch of plan parts while I sent him an axe. One of the planes (#14 I believe) had a stripped barrel nut on the tote. Most likely from a 12 year old over tightening it. Steel threads can strip a brass nut quickly. Anyways, a barrel nut from his cash of parts went into that plane! I have a large amount of parts. But mainly for -#4 and larger. He just so happened to have a #3 that was used for parts so I was able to complete the restoration!!! Thanks again A17!!!!!!!
     
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  9. Downwindtracker2

    Downwindtracker2

    132
    Mar 20, 2019
    Stanley did use standard threads, it's just that they were a obsolete 1860 standard. So when working on planes look after all those nuts and screws.
     
  10. garry3

    garry3

    Sep 11, 2012
    And cheaper. I remember the young guys going through blades like crazy. Looking at those other newer utility knifes it doesn't look like they would be very good for dry wall. Is the Stanley 199 still king with the hangers?
     
  11. Downwindtracker2

    Downwindtracker2

    132
    Mar 20, 2019
    I'm an old phart, but I just helped with the hanging of 7 sheets. Lightweight 1/2". The Stanley Max has a large knob on the side that when tightened up all the way will firm up the blade , unlike the old #99. When loosen it off the side will flip open to change the blade. It's an improvement. I buy the blades in the plastic box of a 100.
     
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  12. I'mSoSharp

    I'mSoSharp

    679
    Mar 8, 2011
    I'm sure I have more Stanley kicking about but these are all I could lay my hands on.........

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  13. Brian Rust

    Brian Rust

    762
    Nov 14, 2017
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    I went to a new antique shop I had heard about recently in the next town over. No luck with axes but I did find a Stanley #80 scraper and the jewel of the day is the Stanley #71 1/2! I have the 71 and 271 so now I have the three main router planes. Not counting the pre iron planes. Also found the little raker gauge and I think the violin makers plane/ “squirrel tail” plane is a Stanley. It is very old but there are no markings. Thanks for lookin!
     
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  14. rjdankert

    rjdankert Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 10, 2011
    ?????

    #100 Block plane, 3 1/2"L, 1"W, 3/8lb, 1898-1958.
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    Never thought I'd make it to #100, did you? Well, neither did I. Sad thing is, I've got another 100, or so, to go. UGH! What a thankless task this is. I wish I had listened to my father's advice to become a professional wrestler, er, where was I? Oh yeah, this is a toy-sized block plane, designed to be used with one hand. It has a squirrel tail iron handle at its rear, which rests nicely in the palm of the hand. The handle has a hole drilled in it so that the tool can be hung out of the way.

    The plane is particularly suited for miniature and model work. A simple screw-activated lever cap, which is forced against a rod that extends across the plane's width (cheek to cheek), is used to secure the cutter in place. This same method of securing the cutter is common to other planes that follow. There is no cutter adjustment mechanism; this is done entirely by hand.

    Later models, ca. post-WWII, have their lever caps finished in red paint which gives them a unique look from the ones that are all japanned. Many of the planes have no markings on them, including the cutter.
    http://www.supertool.com/StanleyBG/stan11.htm


    Bob
     
  15. Downwindtracker2

    Downwindtracker2

    132
    Mar 20, 2019
    Lee Valley Veritas makes copies if you can't find Stanleys.
     
  16. Brian Rust

    Brian Rust

    762
    Nov 14, 2017
    Yes I do have a few 100s. This one is very different than the Stanley 100 though. It is about twice the size and does not have the cross bar for the lever cap to pivot on. It is tightened just by a screw being tightened into the body. I have seen many of these examples but none that are the same as this plane. Thanks for the post!!
     
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  17. I'mSoSharp

    I'mSoSharp

    679
    Mar 8, 2011
    Picked this up recently, a suprise when I wire brushed it!

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    I had no idea Stanley made a slip fit claw hammer..........
     
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  18. Kevin Houtzager

    Kevin Houtzager

    908
    Jun 25, 2017
    X
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2019
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  19. garry3

    garry3

    Sep 11, 2012
    Stanley no 49 drill bit depth gauge.

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  20. Miller '72

    Miller '72 Gold Member Gold Member

    Jul 25, 2017
    That's a great piece.

    Added to the list ;):thumbsup:
     
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