The 2020 Garden, Landscape, and Other Stuff Thread...

Discussion in 'Community Center' started by annr, Jan 19, 2020.

  1. taldesta

    taldesta Retired :-) Time is the Gold Platinum Member

    Jan 24, 2013
    @22-rimfire Spring is so early here too ... I've put out the hummingbird feeder. It freezes pretty solid overnight but thaws quickly in the morning sunshine. The feeder has a built-in ant moat and I hang it on a second ant moat knowing how the hummers stay healthier with clean, uncontaminated food. Now the chickadees drink the water from the moats ... and some of them hit the sugar water frequently too. I leave the feeders open for the orioles and hummers - bees don't seem to bother. Still watching for Busby to return early May.

    The bee balm planted year before last is over-running its area and needs dividing. May realize my red garden on the flats after all - or at east the start of it. Thanks for info re: tiller.

    No dish for high speed in sight. External modems are ordered and should arrive by mail. It will be nice to go online in comfort again .. even if v e r y s l o w l y!

    Snow gone mostly. Remembering snow from last April 27th ... 2019 haha!
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2020
  2. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 20, 2005
    I really need to make a cage like that for my Christmas cactus so the squirrels don't ruin them if I put them outdoors. I doubt they are much good to eat but a squirrel can ruin years of growth in minutes. I would like to move most of them outdoors during the summer time, but the problem has been the squirrels. We get visited by raccoons and possoms frequently. But I doubt they would have much interest in Christmas cactus.

    @taldesta I just made up a new batch of sugar water for the hummer feeder. I only make a cup at a time generally. The nectar level has been going down, but I have not seen a hummingbird. I think they are here and I just haven't seen one at the feeder yet.
     
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  3. timberweasel

    timberweasel Platinum Member Platinum Member

    Jan 5, 2011
    Tree rats (squirrels) and raccoons are the bane of my gardening projects. I had a couple tomato plants last year and the squirrels took every single fruit I managed to grow. They would take a nibble or two and leave the rest. Both squirrels and raccoons seem to be interested in tipping over any potted plant they can find and digging up the rest. Cute critters but horribly destructive.
     
  4. annr

    annr

    Nov 15, 2006
    I was concerned laundry would not be considered essential at this point—and potentially no WiFi. Whew!

    I’m waiting to see if lawn cutting is considered an essential service since we’ll be looking at about 3’ of grass in a couple of weeks and/or hiring a goat or 2!

    Stay well up there.
     
  5. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 20, 2005
    @taldesta Thought you might find this wood sculpture interesting since you like hummingbirds. My wife got this from a coworker (her husband makes them) a couple years ago. We got two and gave one to my sister for Christmas. Still have not rebuilt my fencing on the deck. :D
    IMG_5944ed.jpg

    @annr The lawn care people have continued mowing yards here for now. I suspect they are considered "essential" and pretty low risk in terms of either catching or spreading the virus.
     
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  6. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 20, 2005
    I'm not a big fan of tree rats. I have to admit that I enjoy seeing our cats chasing them. On occasion, they climb way up a tree after them which I find humorous. They have not hit my tomatoes that I am aware of in the past. Maybe this is the year for that? My cage would not have to be so tall as it is for short house plants (maybe 15 inches for flexibility).
     
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  7. timberweasel

    timberweasel Platinum Member Platinum Member

    Jan 5, 2011
    Thought I'd share a few pics of my 2019 gardening/yard projects. Hope to do better this year! :):thumbsup:

    Had a couple of trees that needed to come down. I built a retainer wall from the wood. Mulched the rest with some cedar boughs in my wood chipper.

    yard201904.jpg

    Put down some drainage rock between my garage and a flowerbed. Rocking dual rain barrels too.

    yard201901.jpg

    Tomatoes and potted plants on a bench I built from scrap 2x4.

    yard201902.jpg

    Built a BBQ shelter from scrap 2x4 and tin left over from my garage roof project.

    yard201903.jpg
     
  8. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 20, 2005
    I like the cages. They make ones that are sort of reversed in design that I sort of like but I can't find them anywhere in the last year. Basically they are big on the bottom and funnel smaller with height. I put my cages out pretty quick also.
     
  9. taldesta

    taldesta Retired :-) Time is the Gold Platinum Member

    Jan 24, 2013
    Go for the goatx2. Impress the neighbours. They're quirky but don't charge for the fertilizer. The goats ... not the neighbours.

    Roaring in here at 26.4 kbs - delighted to have the extra .4 too :rolleyes: - can't see the icon to left, trust it is only one roll eyes. The only two choices that are visible are the thumbs down and poop and they just don't suit my happy mood. After all, I'm finally online again from the comfort of my lazyboy :)

    Snow over last night is gone now.
     
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  10. taldesta

    taldesta Retired :-) Time is the Gold Platinum Member

    Jan 24, 2013
    That sculpture is a beauty - love it!
     
  11. taldesta

    taldesta Retired :-) Time is the Gold Platinum Member

    Jan 24, 2013
    timberweasel ... on the bench beside the tomato plants - are they the small animal deterrent mats (spike surface)?
     
  12. timberweasel

    timberweasel Platinum Member Platinum Member

    Jan 5, 2011
    Yep. I saw them at the dollar store one day and thought I'd give them a go. They can snap together to make a bigger mat. The squirrels just laugh at them and push 'em away, but maybe they work better if anchored down... I think they're designed to go down in lawn/soil though (shallow spikes on the bottom.)
     
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  13. taldesta

    taldesta Retired :-) Time is the Gold Platinum Member

    Jan 24, 2013
    LEGION 12 ... is that corn going into your raised garden or are you going sod-buster on your beautiful lawn? Just curious. I still have corn seeds from last year and plan to try again. Nicely done pic too ... you're into model building?
     
  14. taldesta

    taldesta Retired :-) Time is the Gold Platinum Member

    Jan 24, 2013
    Just caught your images now - you pay a lot of attention to your gardens. From the pics I would ask also about the exposure to the sun that the potatoes get under what looks like a great tree canopy- I do assume they get full sun though.

    Drainage - I've often found that the drainage holes get blocked by earth no matter how many ... and so I make sure to place a lot of stones on top of them in the containers to prevent the problem. Don't know if this is helpful.

    And, please pardon my curiosity, but do you link your rain barrels with a hose? I see the trough pours into the one on the left and wonder if they are joined in a system.
     
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  15. LEGION 12

    LEGION 12

    Jan 8, 2009
    Was going to try the corn in the raised bed . Yes I build ship's in the winter.[​IMG]
     
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  16. timberweasel

    timberweasel Platinum Member Platinum Member

    Jan 5, 2011
    Thank you, Taldesta. My landscaping/gardening project is a slow process but I'm enjoying it and pleased by the results so far.

    The potato cage gets maximum sunlight throughout the day and early evening. I think you're correct about the drainage holes clogging. Maybe I'll try making a coarse filter of some kind with crushed rock in a burlap sack that can sit at the bottom of the pail before adding soil. I think loose rock would make things harder come harvest time.

    As for the rain barrels, they are linked together by a hose just below the lids. The idea was to store enough rain water for the lawn, plants and flowerbeds during any summer municipal water restrictions. But last year, we had so much rain that it was nice to have both barrels running as a buffer for the water that would otherwise pool close to the house and seep into my basement. I have an older house, and the basement was pretty much dry all summer. :thumbsup:
     
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  17. timberweasel

    timberweasel Platinum Member Platinum Member

    Jan 5, 2011
    @22-rimfire

    Good info on the electric tiller; thanks for posting!

    I've shied away from electric garden equipment in the past. I have a gas mower, trimmer, and wood chipper, but I bought an electric chainsaw last year. It was adequate cutting up a few trees. I was thinking about picking up a tiller to combat the running bamboo some fool planted in the yard years before I bought the house. Maybe I'll go electric.

    To anyone thinking about planting bamboo in their garden or yard: bamboo is evil and grows/spreads like mad--make sure you get a clumping variety. Better still just to avoid it all together. Great for privacy foliage but there are better plants and shrubs, IMO. I planted some lilac bushes last spring to fill the void--I reckon I'll find out if they've survived over the winter soon.
     
  18. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 20, 2005
    I bought the 13.5 Amp Earthwise which is 16 inches wide (6 tines). They make smaller ones. I thought the electric motor might be larger with the higher amperage. But I don't really know. I think it will work out well for me since I don't use a tiller that often quite frankly. It is made in China if that matters. Been really pleased with Home Depot's order with pick up at store.
    Earthwise 13.5 Amp Electric Mini Tiller.JPG
    I also shied away from electric garden equipment which started years ago with a corded weedeater that I never cared for much. Moved to gas powered and now to battery powered.
     
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  19. timberweasel

    timberweasel Platinum Member Platinum Member

    Jan 5, 2011
    I think electric power tools (especially cordless) have vastly improved in the past few years. I'm coming around... slowly :)
     
  20. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 20, 2005
    I agree. Batteries have gotten much larger (volts) and more affordable. Other than the tiller, the only corded electric lawn & garden tool I have is a hedge trimmer. I use it maybe twice a year and everything is close to the house distance wise for the cord. I generally don't like flat topped hedges or bushes and go with a more controlled natural look overall. The next item may be a battery powered pole saw (little chain saw on a pole extension). I think I would find this useful periodically. Realizing this is a knife forum, I guess I'm supposed to use a machete or chopper knife. I have those too, but I'm lazy.

    Added Saturday, 4/11/20: We had a light frost this morning. This is getting pretty late for here. There were frost advisories last evening. Low temp was about 37*F. I covered all of my tomatoes and pepper plants and placed a couple peppers in containers in my garage for the night. No damage that I observed.
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2020
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