The most important lesson you've learned about knives.

Discussion in 'General Knife Discussion' started by OliverKF, Jul 14, 2020.

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  1. Dr Heelhook

    Dr Heelhook

    Jul 24, 2007
    Of course I've learned a lot of small things and details since I got involved in this hobby, but the main revelation to me that I didn't know before has probably been what a big industry it is and how much people are willing to pay for certain knives.
     
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  2. Dr Heelhook

    Dr Heelhook

    Jul 24, 2007
    Good way to put it.
     
  3. Lee D

    Lee D Basic Member Basic Member

    May 27, 2013
    No matter how tempted you are, don’t sell knives you are sentimentally attached to. Been there, and I hate myself for it.
     
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  4. cbrstar

    cbrstar Gold Member Gold Member

    939
    Sep 7, 2015
    Never judge a book by it's cover.

    I've bought knives that looked perfect to me on paper but IRL were kinda meh. And knives I hated but IRL something clicked and they became one of my favorite.
     
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  5. Lee D

    Lee D Basic Member Basic Member

    May 27, 2013
    When trading with some folks, they’ll tell you that your knives are crap, and their knives are gold.
    (Same applies to firearms)
     
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  6. herisson

    herisson Apple slicing rocking chair dweller Platinum Member

    Mar 11, 2013
    Don't listen to people...
     
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  7. Kmikaz3

    Kmikaz3 Basic Member Basic Member

    441
    Aug 28, 2019
    That you've never been that happy to empty your bank account.....
     
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  8. CarsonWayne

    CarsonWayne Basic Member Basic Member

    183
    Mar 2, 2020
    "Touching up your edge every now and again beats a full-on sharpening session."

    This is a great reminder, even to a guy that's been sharpening knives for 30+ years.
     
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  9. herisson

    herisson Apple slicing rocking chair dweller Platinum Member

    Mar 11, 2013
    That's the way you do it ! Took me around 30 years, too, to understand that. But better late than never, right ?
     
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2020
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  10. CarsonWayne

    CarsonWayne Basic Member Basic Member

    183
    Mar 2, 2020
    Ha, I'm not so sure I've learned my lesson, yet. I still have to break out the diamond stones when I let one of the super steels go too long without a touch up.
     
  11. SALTY

    SALTY Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 19, 2000
    That after a certain price point, the margin of quality does not increase proportionate with the margin increase in price.
    Put differently, a $50 knife is way, way better than a $25 knife; a $100 knife is way better than a $50 knife - but a $200 knife may not be so proportionately better than a $100 knife. The there is more true as the numbers get bigger.

    Additionally, there is much more innate joy in using the daylights out of a $100 knife than there is owning but being afraid to use a $500 knife.

    I've also learned that those who really use ... I really use at a significant intensity and for a significant amount of time generally seem to have less expensive knives. Those that have unused or very lightly used safe queens and pocket jewelry generally have more expensive knives. Yes, these are exceptions - many on BF, but generally speaking that is what I have found over the years.
     
  12. Ruzster

    Ruzster

    884
    May 7, 2001
    Unless you’re a smoker yourself or are unbothered by the lingering odor of stale cigarette smoke, make sure you’re buying knives and gear from a smoke-free environment.
     
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  13. CarsonWayne

    CarsonWayne Basic Member Basic Member

    183
    Mar 2, 2020
    I've bought dozens of knives online and have never smelled smoke on one, though, they are all folders. Maybe if you're buying a fixed blade with a sheath? I can see how maybe the leather sheath would absorb smoke.

    I am a non-smoker, and I wipe down all knives with rubbing alcohol and a heavy rag after unboxing.
     
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  14. justjed

    justjed

    864
    Oct 23, 2010
    If it doesn't get used, it's not a knife. It's a paperweight.

    I have exactly one, an 8" downswept double edge damascus blade with snakewood scales and mosaic pins. The maker sold it to me for less than the price of the materials.

    I carry a $300 fixed blade every day. I don't really care about folders, tho I carry one of those every day, as well. I've never paid more than $100 for a folder.
     
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  15. marchone

    marchone Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 13, 2013
    I have plenty of those.
     
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  16. justjed

    justjed

    864
    Oct 23, 2010
    Nothing wrong with that. Different strokes...
     
  17. cbach8tw

    cbach8tw Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 9, 2006
    When you're thinking about a new knife, and the reasons you think why it would be a great addition, remember you probably have knives in your collection that you bought for the very same reason, so go use them and rediscover them. Maybe it was the the excitement of getting something new in the mail that peaked your interest.
     
  18. justjed

    justjed

    864
    Oct 23, 2010
    The knife you're carrying is more useful than the one you left at home.
     
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  19. CHNeal

    CHNeal Gold Member Gold Member

    975
    Nov 24, 2019
    Never sell a Sebenza.
     
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  20. cbach8tw

    cbach8tw Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 9, 2006
    Two knives are one.
     
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