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What would YOU do with this axe?

Discussion in 'Axe, Tomahawk, & Hatchet Forum' started by Glenn Bailey, May 21, 2020.

  1. Miller '72

    Miller '72

    Jul 25, 2017
    What a fantastic pay out on all your work. They look great and in my opinion...there are no bad RIXFORDS
     
  2. Glenn Bailey

    Glenn Bailey Gold Member Gold Member

    165
    Jun 1, 2017
    Thanks, and I agree. Excluding the river axes, I haven't come across one that, when tuned, didn't exceed my expectations.
     
  3. Glenn Bailey

    Glenn Bailey Gold Member Gold Member

    165
    Jun 1, 2017
    Sorry, I miss spoke. Plumbs are the bomb! Rixford's are questionable at best. I'd recommend staying away from them. Send them my way if you find them and I'll dispose of them properly.
     
  4. Miller '72

    Miller '72

    Jul 25, 2017
    Yes i agree lol...the river axes though...really beautiful!
     
    Yankee Josh, Meek1 and Glenn Bailey like this.
  5. Glenn Bailey

    Glenn Bailey Gold Member Gold Member

    165
    Jun 1, 2017
    How to fix this poor, abused, Rixford boys axe?!

    Here is the problem I need help with- it appears that the top of the eye was hammered and mushroomed inwards (ignoring all the other mushrooming). I need to clear that out to re-haft. I don't really have many power tools, angle grind would be tops for what I have available. Should I try to hammer the fold out with a screw driver from the other end? Try to use the angle grinder from the top in that small space? File from the top (again, small space)? What would you do (if you had only simple tools available?)

    Thanks for all ideas!!!

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    Meek1 and Miller '72 like this.
  6. crbnSteeladdict

    crbnSteeladdict

    Jul 31, 2017
    Round and Half Round files. Dowel with sand paper glued to it might do the trick as cheap option.
     
    Last edited: Nov 22, 2020
    Square_peg, A17, Glenn Bailey and 3 others like this.
  7. Miller '72

    Miller '72

    Jul 25, 2017
    Yes exactly. Half round files for the eye
     
  8. EngrSorenson

    EngrSorenson Gold Member Gold Member Basic Member

    Jul 3, 2019
    Boy, I see some amazing finds in here; Also some oddities- I didn't realized they made wedge-shaped sledgehammers. :D

    I'm seeing some of the tops of the eyes aren't quiet filled with haft- what's going on there? Maybe my ignorance is showing, but I always thought the eye of the axe should be filled with haft. I have a very old and horribly abused E&S (which I further abused through modification), and I happened to notice that the eye length on the top is about 1/4-1/2" longer than on the bottom, which of course makes that impossible to fit with the standard single wedge methods.
     
    Yankee Josh, Glenn Bailey and Meek1 like this.
  9. crbnSteeladdict

    crbnSteeladdict

    Jul 31, 2017
    #CustomWedgeSizeMatters
    Check @Yankee Josh posts; he often rehangs Maine axes.
    https://bladeforums.com/threads/what-did-you-rehang-today.1064461/page-315#post-19467030
     
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2020
  10. Glenn Bailey

    Glenn Bailey Gold Member Gold Member

    165
    Jun 1, 2017
    Worked like a charm, thanks all!

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    Square_peg, Yankee Josh, A17 and 4 others like this.
  11. A17

    A17

    Jan 9, 2018
    Also, look at some of @muleman77's older posts, he used to put full size axes on boy's axe handles and would use oversized wedges.
     
  12. Yankee Josh

    Yankee Josh Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 31, 2018
    What you noticed is indicative of Maine axes especially but more generally the majority of well made vintage ones. They drifted the eyes to be not only wider but longer on the top. That larger area works to increase surface area (marginally) but more importantly provides a clamping force holding the head down on to the haft. The "taper" of the eye.
    Emerson Stevens often left a "bump" in the center of the back of the eye. As you mentioned that further limits the amount of tongue you can fit up through the eye. If you just make sure your wedge is sufficiently long to completely fill the eye and you'll never have an issue. I haven't at least.
    I do use yellow and white birch for wedges. They are quite strong, but yet are elastic. They squeeze in and conform to gaps and imperfections while retaining plenty enough strength to keep that eye full front to back.
    For me personally the more taper in the eye that I see the more esteem it's maker has in my eyes.
    While no taper necessitates leaving the tongue proud, there's no such thing as too much taper.
     
    EngrSorenson likes this.
  13. EngrSorenson

    EngrSorenson Gold Member Gold Member Basic Member

    Jul 3, 2019
    wow. I came here just to see an interesting thread, and I learned so much. Intuitively I’ve left hafts proud because I imagined the eyes of axe heads were essentially parallel, top to bottom. I see why it makes sense to flair the sides of the eye, as that provides more surface once it’s wedged. Front-to-back flair doesn’t make as much sense to me, but I’m hardly an expert. Thanks for the replies everyone!
     

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